This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ALLIANCE LEISURE PROMOTION


CLIENT SUPPORT (PART ONE)


Whether it’s pre-sales assistance, staff training, or a complete ‘no-results, no-fee’ package, Alliance has a bespoke solution for all businesses, says head of client support, Paul Woodford


What’s the scope of Alliance Leisure’s client support? We offer complete solutions for leisure sites to help drive their business forward. We might work with them on increasing sales, retention or customer service – anything that helps them to boost revenues, improve performance and increase customer satisfaction. What we really excel at is changing


culture within an organisation – showing them how to drive that change, starting with their staff, and embedding proven systems, processes and techniques.


Do you have to be an existing Alliance customer to benefi t from this help? No, a few years ago these services were only available to the facilities we’d built or refurbished, but now we work with any business that needs our help. We mostly work with local authority


and leisure trust sites, but also some private businesses, in a wide variety of leisure areas such as fi tness, bowling, spa, high ropes, swimming and toning centres, etc. We also work with some of the large hotels chains such as Holiday Inn and Village Hotels.


Follow the series


1. Scoping / Investigation 2. Conceptualisation 3. Viability assessment & full feasibility


4. Site investigation 5. Fixed price contracts 6. Overseeing the building work 7. Ordering phase 8. Client support (part 1) 9. Client support (part 2)


So how do you begin to change the culture of an organisation? We work with a lot of organisations in the public sector that don’t really have any kind of brand identity. They might have a nicely-designed logo which they think is their brand, but true brand identity is what’s coursing through the veins of their staff, and how those staff feel about the organisation. Motivation and driving income can


be a problem in facilities where there are a lot of part-time workers, but we help to train all staff, empower them with knowledge and skills, get them passionate about what they do, get


them passionate about selling – and that means ALL staff. Everyone needs to be involved in selling to customers, often in ways they don’t even realise is selling. In fact we hardly ever use the word ‘selling’ when training our clients.


Can you explain the process that you take businesses through? After we’ve looked at overall branding and the strategic vision with senior management, we move onto training. There’s a base level training that all staff must complete, followed by an intermediate level where key members are trained in lead generation. We often fi nd through this process


that unexpected staff members emerge as really enthusiastic sales people, with the potential to become true brand ambassadors for the company. While we can deliver motivational


one-off training days, they don’t really change anything. We prefer to work on longer-term packages with clients so their culture really can transform.


What follows the Alliance training stage? We then focus on marketing and what the business specifically needs to achieve. Foundation marketing is quite general – such as leaflet distribution, while targeted marketing is where we start to drill down into a site’s data – for example what Mosaic profiles should they be looking to attract? With some offers, like Toning Suites,


there’s a very clear demographic and we know exactly how to tailor marketing literature so that it talks to these users. With our pinpoint marketing, we’ll purchase data relevant to the site.


The fi tness team at Coventry Sports & Leisure were also trained in customer service 76 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


What’s the next step? Retention, which is a really key area for all fitness and membership-based business, and tends to cause them real


May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92