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SPEEDFLEX Heart rate-based training can supercharge a member’s exercise results


achieve sustained behaviour change,” says Jonathan Monks, UK director at CFM/MYZONE. “The game-based features such as inclusive effort-based challenges and social functionalities for sharing goals, workouts and progress makes exercise more fun and develops a sense of community.” The solution was installed in De Vere’s


25 Velocity Health & Fitness Clubs in 2013 and proved so popular that the chain launched a dedicated MYZONE membership this January. The premium package – which includes a MYZONE belt, personal training sessions and a number of challenges – was taken up by around 1,000 people in January alone. “MYZONE works brilliantly for us.


Members can see how a workout on something like the battle ropes in the functional area really ramps up their effort points, which is very rewarding,” says Chris Southall, leisure director at De Vere Hotels & Resorts.


Zones for results Helen Holmes, UK and international trainer for Keiser UK, has long


May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


advocated heart rate-based training as a means of motivating and retaining members. After seven years delivering V02 fitness assessments, she developed the Fit4Life heart rate training programme (see p68). The core of these interval-based


sessions is an accurate heart rate zone chart, which enables individuals to find their heart rates and work in the correct zone for their goal, from fat-burning to threshold sessions. Fine- tuned in a number of clubs over the last two years, the class has proved popular with new members as well as cyclists, triathletes and runners. Meanwhile, Polar launched its new


heart rate-based training solution in January of this year. The free app for iPad works with a Polar H7 heart rate sensor to allow instructors to monitor the real-time heart rate and performance data for individuals and classes of up to 40 people. The system provides a visual display of group heart rate data, adding a fun and competitive spirit to workouts. Clubs can tap into this by creating bespoke class and club


issued with a heart rate band and shown their results – including time spent in each training zone, recovery rate, training load and total Kcal expenditure – at the end of each training session. “The heart rate system is an


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integral part of the Speedflex concept. It’s an important tool for our personal trainers as they’re able to constantly assess performance, knowing whether customers are pushing themselves too hard or too little. The system helps with member retention too – the more feedback we can give customers, the better the service we offer,” says Matt Bolam, head of training. “Heart rate monitors can give


a sense of competitiveness, with clients attempting to equal or better their previous training load score. We also use the system to assess heart rate recovery. As clients become fitter, they see a huge improvement in recovery rates between working sets, which they find very motivating,” he adds.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 67


peedflex uses the Polar Team 2 heart rate monitoring system. Participants are


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