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SPORTS CONDITIONING


Prehab services are increasingly popular in the City, where cash-rich, time-poor clients want to maximise every workout While there are no official


partnerships, individual clinics within the chain have built strong links with the gyms and PTs that they rate highly in their area, so that they can work together to meet a client’s needs. Six Physio movement assessments


use an iPad set-up to video clients performing their chosen activity. “We can identify areas that may need a little more work, either because they’re not moving well or not stabilising well,” explains Carla Lodweijks, clinic director at the Fleet Street branch. Real-time ultrasound is also used to monitor different muscles during movement.


“Our aim is to provide a comprehensive assessment and ensure that the client goes away with a clear idea of the exercises they need to do to prevent injury,” she adds. Meanwhile, Run 3D is a specialist


within the running arena and claims to be the UK’s first company to offer a three-dimensional motion analysis service. “We assess running technique from above, to the side and behind, comparing the results to our database of thousands of runners to advise on what injuries a runner may be vulnerable to and how to prevent them,” explains director Dr Jessica Leitch. Run 3D’s flagship clinic is in


Oxford, but it also franchises the Run 3D service to sports injury clinics, podiatrists and physiotherapists.


Complex terminology won’t put your


members at ease. You don’t want people to leave an assessemnt feeling that they are


‘broken’ and need to be ‘fixed’


“Clinics lease the equipment from us and we train them in how to use it,” says Leitch. “They then make revenue by selling the service to their clients.” Due to the specialist nature of the


analysis, a healthcare professional (such as a physio, biomechanist, sports therapist or sports massage therapist) is needed on-site to interpret the data in a meaningful way. “Thus far, we’ve been approached by healthcare professionals who want to make their clinics stand out from the crowd,” says Leitch. “But that’s not to say we wouldn’t be open to gyms and health clubs taking on the system, as many now have such specialists on-board anyway.” Bedford agrees that forging links with


external experts could be a good way of offering specialist services to club members. But he has a caveat: choose carefully. “Complex terminology that


56 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


might be acceptable within a specialist clinic won’t put your members at ease,” he says. “And you don’t want people to leave an assessment with the feeling that they are ‘broken’ and need to be ‘fixed’.”


PERCEIVED VALUE There’s no doubt that there’s a growing demand for prehab services – particularly in areas like the City of London, where hardcore exercisers are cash-rich but time-poor and want to maximise every workout. But can prehab earn its keep? While Bedford says it’s difficult to quantify the impact such services have on member retention and exercise adherence without data, Nuffield’s experience suggests investing in pre-exercise assessment and early-days support adds value when it’s included within a membership cost. Paying services like MAT and PRP


bring in their own revenue. MAT at Integra costs from £90 per session. A PRP screen at The Third Space, regardless of whether you’re a member, costs £150, with an additional charge of £90 for any follow-up sessions – alongside fees earned from any PT sessions the client may take up. But Cole believes its contribution goes beyond the club’s coffers. “It adds perceived value,” he says. “Members feel more cared for. I’d like to think that, in time, this sort of service could be industry standard.” ●


May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


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