This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Operators must consider offering activities in non-traditional fitness environments to engage new audiences


GEORGINA FORD Director • CK Academy


“A


s a sector, we’re still not reaching out and appealing to those who


need our skills the most. It’s critical that we continue to look outside the sector and mirror other models that have broken new ground and reached new and diverse markets. Individually we don’t have the answer, so it has to be a collective sharing of ideas, embracing technology and being honest. Being active requires a dedicated mindset shift for many


individuals, so we have to get better at the emotional connections, offering real and effective support – both in the clubs and at home – and continuing to harness expertise in understanding behavioural change. We must attract educated, passionate, enthusiastic,


empathetic staff who enjoy supporting inactive people to develop lifestyle changes that are practical, lasting and have impact. We also need inspirational, dynamic, successful leaders who will not be afraid to turn our current models on their heads and speak unpalatable truths when required. This is a tangible target that is achievable, but not in isolation.


In order to tackle inactivity, and be heard by those who need us, the sector needs government to invest in a similar fashion to the successful smoking cessation campaigns.


” May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


MICHELLE SEGAR SHARP Center co-director • University of Michigan, US


“G


oals like this are important for focusing efforts and building


momentum. Changing behaviour in sustainable ways is the key to success. People’s motivation for being regularly active is what


determines whether physical activity feels like a chore or a gift. So rather than promoting exercise as medicine, we should be promoting physical movement as a revitalisation strategy that helps us better succeed at what matters most. Physical activity must feel accessible and do-able, and people


should be given permission to move in ways that feel good to them. People need to believe all movement they can do counts, so they can be successful each day – something that motivates more movement. Research shows that, in general, if people exercise at higher intensities than they want to – because they’ve been directed to do so or feel they should – they have increased displeasure, and this becomes a recipe for them avoiding further exercise. Ask your members to notice how they feel when they move


during the day: do they have more energy or focus? Once people become aware of how physical movement enhances how they feel and function, it will become a ‘need’ instead of a ‘should’.


” Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 33


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