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INTERNATIONAL


Premier Training teams up with Talwalkars in India


Premier Training International (PTI) has embarked on an international partnership with Talwalkars – one of India’s largest health club chains – to provide ongoing education, training and development to over 180 of its PTs and fitness professionals. Launched last month, the education


pathway scheme includes kinesiology, anatomy and physiology, as well as customer service. PTI will deliver leadership and management training to over 40 of Talwalkars’ senior managers, as well as a five-day Advanced Fitness Skills course to 140 of its fitness trainers. The courses will be part of a larger


education pathway that has the end goal of UK Level 3 accreditation, REPs membership and an overseas internship. The objective is to enhance employee performance levels in a bid to propel the Indian health and fitness sector closer to the standards of the international market. Details: http://lei.sr?a=x7D3a


Speedflex opens first overseas facility in Dubai


Following its launch in the UK last year, circuit-based training concept Speedflex has announced the opening of its first overseas site, in Dubai. UAE-based hospitality firm JA Resorts


& Hotels will be opening the facility in its JA Ocean View Hotel this month. Tapping into the growing trend of HIIT


training and group exercise, each 45-minute, instructor-led circuit features seven Speedflex machines that automatically respond to, and create resistance levels based on, the individual’s force. Details: http://lei.sr?a=m5a8g


Vivafit: Indonesian master franchise agreement


Vivafit, the franchisor of women-only express gyms, has signed a master franchise agreement for Indonesia. Franchisee CNI is a manufacturer and


distributor of nutritional supplements, food, cosmetics, cooking utensils and cleaning products, and also operates in India, the Philippines, China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Brunei and Taiwan. The company is said to be planning a


large expansion of the Vivafit network across Indonesia, with the stated intention of opening hundreds of clubs. Details: http://lei.sr?a=H2Q5V


A new fitness brand, Life1 Club, opened in the Hungarian city of Pecs – the country’s fifth largest city – in February. Owned by a group of companies


– including Fitness Vision Hungary – the 1,200sq m club caters exclusively for women. With membership costing €20-30 a month, the club aims to offer a welcoming, modern,


NEWS Life1 Club launches in Hungary


high quality environment for its clients at an affordable price. There’s a big emphasis in the club on


ensuring that female members feel comfortable in their workout space. Equipment is strategically positioned in the gym so members don’t feel exposed while they work out. The gym has been equipped by Star Trac, including E Series cardio, Inspiration strength, Impact strength, Max Rack, Smith machine, upright and recumbent bikes and 21 Spinner bikes. Alongside the gym space are two group exercise studios: one for group cycling and the other for activities such as aerobics. Fitness Vision Hungary


Equipment has been laid out so its female members don’t feel exposed


has plans to open a further two clubs in 2014. Details: http://lei.sr?a=e9j5M


Eurobarometer reveals falling participation


In 2013, 74 per cent of EU citizens were not members of any type of sport or exercise club, according to the latest Eurobarometer report – a rise from 67 per cent in 2009. Sweden has the highest penetration rate


for health and fitness clubs – 33 per cent – with Denmark in second place at 25 per cent. Lithuania and Bulgaria were at the bottom of the table with 1 per cent and 2 per cent respectively. One significant change from 2009 to 2013


was in the engagement levels of younger women particularly, who are less active than men. High levels of inactivity also exist among those aged over 55. Details: http://lei.sr?a=O6n2n


Growth of corporate wellness in the US More needs to be done to engage younger women


Corporate employers in the US that invest in wellness intend to spend an average of US$594 per employee on wellness incentives within their healthcare programmes for 2014, according to new research from the National Business Group on Health. The survey is the latest in a series dating back


to 2009, which analyse the growth of corporate health improvement programmes. The latest figures represent an increase of 15 per cent on 2013’s average of US$521, and are more than double the average of US$260 reported five years ago. The largest increase was among companies with fewer than 5,000 employees,


18 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


where the per employee average climbed to US$595, one-third higher than in 2013. The most popular wellness programmes


are focused on lifestyle management, incorporating physical activity, weight management and stress management. The survey also found that 95 per cent of


US companies plan to offer some kind of health improvement programme for their employees, with the percentage of companies offering incentives to participate in these initiatives increasing from 57 per cent in 2009 to 74 per cent in 2014. Details: http://lei.sr?a=U2V5P


May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


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