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UPDATE


A new report from Oxygen Consulting has said that the physical activity sector must “unleash” its social purpose to thrive among the wave of private and budget gyms. The report – supported by


Matrix, The Gym Group and ukactive – says that health and fitness clubs must take cues from social purpose- led brands such as Innocent, Tom’s Shoes and Apple if they want to thrive in the future. The Fitness Sector Social


Good Report details the critical impact of social responsibility on the growth, value and impact of the private gym sector over the next 15 years, against a backdrop of local authority-run leisure facilities and the rise of low-cost gyms. The report also identifies the possible reason


for the gradual decline in public perception of gyms across the country: the takeover of these


The report urges gyms to change perceptions through social purpose


chains by bigger businesses and venture capital funds, which then led to a more ruthless focus on the ‘bottom line’ mentality for those aiming to capitalise on the sector during the 80s and 90s. Details: http://lei.sr?a=C7k3f Please see page 46 for an in-depth feature on The Fitness Sector Social Good Report.


Survey highlights wearable tech trends


The digital revolution may well be upon us, but health and fitness consumers buying wearable technology still prefer to make their purchase in-store than from the company’s website, according to new research from Nielsen. Results from the February Nielsen Health


and Wellness survey of 471 American consumers were combined with findings from the firm’s Connected Life Report to paint a picture of the current relationship between consumers and wearable tech. The report confirmed the rise of wearable


technology, with smartphone apps proving particularly popular for keeping track of wellbeing. In January 2014, 45.8 million US smartphone owners used a health and fitness app – an 18 per cent increase from 39 million users during January 2013. But while the product market is becoming


increasingly technology-focused, traditional methods for purchasing and decision-making remain surprisingly popular: 37 per cent of


Wearable health check: Around two-thirds of fitness band owners say they use their device daily


fitness bands sold were bought by consumers in-store, compared with 33 per cent online from the brand’s website, with Nielsen noting: “Manufacturers of fitness bands should take note of the sway that a hands-on experience can provide.” Details: http://lei.sr?a=Q6n6D


DC Leisure announces rebrand as ‘Places for People’


Leisure operator and developer DC Leisure has rebranded as a social enterprise called Places for People after being acquired by the property management and development group in 2012. DC’s merger with not-for-dividend Places for People marks the first time a leisure


May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


provider has joined forces with a housing provider. The outfit says its core mission is to create active places and healthy people. Places for People Leisure Management will be the industry-facing brand, replacing DC Leisure Management. Details: http://lei.sr?a=T5A4D


13


UK NEWS Gyms must convey a social purpose


Installing Legend...


Installing Legend...


Installing Legend...


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