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News and jobs updated daily on www.healthclubmanagement.co.uk Edited by Jak Phillips. Email: jakphillips@leisuremedia.com Fitness First opens microgym


Fitness First has taken its first step into the UK microgym market by opening BEAT – its new heart rate training club in London’s Charing Cross. The club was previously


hinted at by Fitness First CEO Andrew Cosslett in an interview for the March 2014 edition of Health Club Management, and follows the successful launch in Sydney, Australia, of The Zone – a group exercise-only concept. BEAT forms part of


M3 INDOOR CYCLE M5 ELLIPTICAL AIR RESISTANCE RANGE


The new club runs 14 sessions a day with a choice of five class types


Fitness First’s £270m brand makeover, centred around behavioural psychology and what motivates us to stay fit. “Psychology tell us that, for people to get


most out of their fitness, they need to see progress, feel they’re socially connected and get variety in a positive environment,” says Lee Matthews, head of fitness at Fitness First. “Heart rate training in teams led by experts


generates a highly motivating workout that makes every minute count on the gym floor.” The five classes available range from the


beginner ‘Move Better’ class, intended to take groups up to 65 per cent of their heart rate, right through to 90 per cent ‘HiiT Pro’ classes, designed to push advanced individuals to their limits. Details: http://lei.sr?a=K4X4h


ukactive: The national activity watchdog?


ukactive CEO David Stalker has outlined his organisation’s credentials to serve as independent watchdog for the national physical activity plan suggested in a report from the All-Party Commission on Physical Activity (see also p3). The report – launched by a cross-party


group of politicians including Tanni Grey- Thompson – sets out clear recommendations to tackle the growing physical inactivity epidemic in the UK. It calls for a National Plan of Action to tackle


declining levels of physical activity, backed by all sectors and parties. It also recommends establishing an


independent body to have oversight and ensure accountability for the plan, and Stalker believes ukactive – which highlighted the extent of the inactivity crisis in its recent high- profile Turning the Tide of Inactivity report (see p32) – would be a suitable candidate. “ukactive is uniquely positioned to be a


Stalker: ukactive is ‘uniquely positioned’ to effectively manage the evaluation of a national plan


delivery partner and manage the evaluation of a national plan, so we’re open to discussions,” says Stalker. Details: http://lei.sr?a=T6n3S


LA fitness creditors approve club sell-off proposals


LA fitness has secured approval from the required majority of creditors for its company voluntary arrangements (CVAs), which include the proposed sale of 33 of its UK clubs. The plans, which were initiated on 6 March 2014, received strong support from landlords


May 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


– the largest group of unconnected creditors – with 90 per cent voting in favour of the terms. The CVAs revise lease terms at several


clubs, paving the way for a restructuring plan to refocus LA fitness on a smaller portfolio of 47 clubs. Details: http://lei.sr?a=P7V9C


“We felt that as we moved into the Premier League we needed to purchase what I consider to be Premier League products. I had seen Keiser’s equipment being used at other football clubs and was aware that it was truly functional. We do a lot of rotational core exercises and Keiser is the perfect equipment for these. It is also ideal for the rehabilitation of our players.”


Scott Guyett


Head of Sports Science and Strength & Conditioning Crystal Palace Football Club


Keiser UK Ltd 0845 612 1102


@KeiserUK www.keiseruk.com


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