This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Specialization


Sports can be categorized as either early or late specialization. Artistic and acrobatic sports such as gymnastics, diving and figure skating are considered early specialization sports, as they require athletes to develop complex sport-specific skills prior to maturation. Most sports, including Ultimate, are classified as late specialization sports whereby the development of a well-balanced athlete prior to maturation is the most important consideration. Specialization can occur across sports – with an athlete only playing one sport all the time – and within a sport – with an athlete only playing one position in a given sport. Early-specialization in a late- specialized sport has been show to lead to: • One-sided sport-specific preparation • Lack of basic fundamental movement skills • Overuse injuries • Early burnout


• Early retirement from training and competition and often withdrawl from physical activity


As the development in late specialization sports occurs after maturation, athletes winning at international level competition tend to be older. Such is the case in Ultimate where our international teams average between 27 and 30 years. Young Ultimate athletes should engage in multi-sport programs to develop fundamental movement and sport skills in order to achieve future success on the international stage.


Developmental Age


Developmental age refers to the degree of physical, mental, cognitive and emotional maturity in an individual. Although children may be the same chronological age, they can be four or five years apart based on developmental age due to the variance in the onset and length of puberty. Identifying an athlete’s stage of maturation is not difficult. As individuals mature, there are several time-sensitive periods when there is accelerated adaptation to training. Ultimate’s LTAD model identifies these periods and makes maximum use of them to introduce skill and fitness development.


A participant’s developmental age determines when various aspects of sport and physical activity should be introduced or emphasized. This LTAD model uses the categories “early”, “average” (on- time), or “late” maturers to identify the participant’s developmental age. These designations help coaches and instructors to design instructional, training and competition programs that are appropriate for the athlete’s level of development


Differences in developmental age create advantages and disadvantages for some athletes.


Late developers have a longer period of time to develop important fundamental movement, motor and sport skills as they experience a longer developmental window before the onset of puberty. However, often the sport system favors the early developers because these athletes are bigger, stronger and faster at an earlier chronological age. Often these athletes are given more playing time and are selected more often than their late developing peers.


25


ULTIMATE CANADA LTAD


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72