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Leadership


Inconsistent leadership and ineffective organization hamper the development of Canadian Ultimate. Players and coaches need the support of solid administrative frameworks to deliver programs that maximize player participation, development, and success.


Shortcoming


Club organization is haphazard between different jurisdictions.


Clubs are not always staffed for efficient administration.


Club system is not consistently defined – what is an Ultimate club?


Clubs are not logically structured for accountability and efficiency.


Clubs lack “cradle to grave” culture where members remain involved for life.


Tiered club systems often experience turnover as the best players move up to a higher team.


Many leagues focus on grassroots player development and do not support elite level play.


Many touring team clubs do not have a technical director, head coach or team manager.


Role and qualifications of the touring team club technical director are not defined.


Impact


Competition schedules are often in conflict resulting in players having to make a choice between teams or over-competing.


The administrative function falls on the players resulting in early burnout and loss of experienced leadership.


There is not a consistent model, programs or services for long-time or new members.


Recruitment and retention of members is impacted.


The focus on development within a tiered system is inconsistent from year to year due to ever changing rosters and external influences (e.g. qualification to international tournaments).


Elite teams are not sufficiently supported or represented by local Ultimate organizations.


There may be a lack of continuity within programs, impacting player development.


Board and club administrators may make program decisions on player development without being well informed.


Programs may be developed to meet the needs of a certain age group but not all groups.


ULTIMATE CANADA LTAD


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