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Delos’ standards have gained the advocacy of medics, celebrities and politicians such as Bill Clinton and will.i.am


world – it’s worth US$150trn – and we’re looking to combine that with one of the fastest growing and, arguably, one of the most important industries in the world: health and wellness. More than US$2trn a year is spent on preventative medical intervention, so obviously – for Delos – there’s a massive economic play.”


Biological sustainability There was no major trigger point for setting up Delos says 40-year-old Scialla, whose career had previously centred around banking – first in bond trading on Wall Street, then as a partner at Goldman Sachs. “Around five years ago, as a kind of an aside, I started getting interested in this notion of sustainability and real estate. Lots of great things had gone on in green building and I simply wondered if we could push the envelope so the focus wasn’t only on environmental sustainability, but also on human or biological sustainability when we build things. “The fact is we spend 92 per cent of


our time indoors, so if we can introduce preventative medical intentions into the very spaces that we’re spending our time in, it’s a huge win.” His interest was shared by co-founder Morad Fareed, a former Starwood Hotels & Resorts executive who helped to initiate and develop one of the industry’s fi rst green hotel brands: Element by Westin. Early on, the pair knew they needed some of the best academic, political


March 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


“Real estate is the largest asset class in the world, and we’re looking to combine that with one of the fastest growing industries in the world – health and wellness”


and medical minds involved in Delos – along with a dash of celebrity infl uence


– to tackle something so formidable. Luckily “the story sells itself,” says Scialla. “Everyone we speak to wants to get involved. This is an obvious way to fi nally deliver preventative medicine in a passive way to people on a daily basis.” Over the course of four years,


architects, designers and engineers collaborated with doctors and scientists from leading institutions such as the Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and Columbia Medical School – as well as wellness guru Deepak Chopra – to review more than 4,500 studies to work out how a building could deliver optimal health. “First and foremost we wanted to offer an evidence-based approach,” says Scialla. “With half of these things you can touch or feel them and know that something’s happening, but the other half are working on your body without you necessarily realising it.” The result is the Well Building


Standard™, a framework based on seven elements such as fi tness, good quality air, water and light. These impact on 12 domains of health identifi ed by


Delos, which range from cardiovascular, immune and sleep health to emotional and cognitive function (see Diagram 1, p82). The standards – which are designed to sit in line with existing green building certifi cations such as LEED – can be applied to homes, offi ces, public buildings and hotels, with one of the key ambitions being to create built environments that promote movement. The framework is currently still in pilot,


but Delos has completed four projects over the past three years and has another 15 in the pipeline. In addition, Scialla and his twin brother, who’s also a partner in Delos, converted their own home to trial the Well Building Standard three years ago and have seen the benefi ts fi rst-hand.


“Since completing the renovation, my energy levels are through the roof, I’ve rarely been sick and my sleeping patterns have never been better,” says Scialla. “I’m a healthier person.”


Setting standards In total, there are around 50 possible amenities in the Well Building Standard, with some of the less obvious including shielding from harmful electromagnetic


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 81


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