This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
HALO PROMOTION


Web-based WAM is easy to access and proving a powerful tool at health clubs and spas


FOR THE GOOD HEALTH OF YOUR ASSETS AND YOUR BUSINESS


WAM – Workflow Asset Management – is being hailed by centres around the UK as one of the easiest, most efficient and most affordable maintenance management systems on the market


A


nyone who manages a health centre, leisure club or spa knows that their service and their customers’ experience


is only as good as the equipment, fixtures and fittings around them. Detail matters. The quality and comfort of the slatted seats in the sauna to the temperature in the pool, the lighting and floors in the changing rooms to the equipment in the gym... This is where Workfl ow Asset


Management (WAM) can make a difference. Hundreds of centres like yours across the UK have been discovering the power of this web-based programme to ensure they maximise the effectiveness of their assets. WAM allows them to create their own asset inventory which interacts with a fault reporting and repair system and planned preventative maintenance task schedule. “This programme was created for our


own leisure, health and spa facilities and worked so well we decided to take it to others,” says Kris Price, who leads Halo Leisure Enterprises. “One of the many


advantages is that it is so easy to use. Staff simply access prioritised work schedules and then hit a button, type in update (be it ‘checks made’, ‘fault reported’, ‘part ordered’, ‘work completed’...), hit a button and the system updates. Supervisors can see at a glance what is happening; including the progress of repairs, depreciation values of their assets, contractor servicing and the planned preventative maintenance tasks being carried out. “What’s more,” says Price, “as


organisations are being required to produce evidence that maintenance targets are being achieved, and the value of assets maximised, more groups are swapping paper-based procedures for a system like WAM which improves effi ciency and distinguishes between statutory and desirable commitments.” “There are so many good things about


this system,” says WAM customer, Avalon Leisure’s Malcolm Baker, whose centres in Somerset include spa and health club facilities. “We have one huge database of assets, but WAM incorporates them all and


30 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


the vital checks and maintenance by a whole range of different staff – be it once an hour, once a day, once a week, or once a year,” says Baker. “Once it’s on the system you can allocate jobs to anyone on the rota, from lifeguards or gym staff to cleaners and technicians. Each member of staff simply accesses their own worksheets and, sitting here at my desk now, I can instantly check on progress,” says Baker. “When you have multiple sites it saves so much time by streamlining worksheets, updating them with maintenance required as staff move around.” To find out more about WAM visit their website at www.maxyourassets.com


What makes WAM so affordable?


For groups like Avalon, Baker says it was the price of WAM that attracted them initially. WAM is not charged per user but is accessible for all staff on site for a one-off set up cost per organisation inclusive of training and helpline support and then via an ongoing license fee per location charged monthly and comparable with an average monthly gym membership. There is no minimum contract term.


“We can’t put a figure on the savings it’s brought us - in time, efficiency and more,” says Malcolm Baker.


March 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102