This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
IHRSA EUROPE UPDATE


NEWS


State of the industry: a note from Spain • Pep Viladot • director • Holmes Place


T


he Spanish fi tness industry has faced tough times over recent years. In addition to the ongoing


economic crisis in the country, which has caused uncertainty across all sectors of the economy, the VAT increase of 2012 has had an impact on consumption – including in the fi tness industry. However, fortunately for us, fi tness is


increasingly associated with the physical and mental health of the population. Fitness is no longer considered a luxury, and people certainly don’t consider it to be one of the fi rst things on the list to cut back on when their household fi nances are suff ering. Indeed, it’s seen as an alleviator of two particularly important problems in these troubled times: stress and despondency. As a result, one of the direct consequences


we’re seeing in response to the economy is an approximately 20 per cent increase in the daily usage of fi tness facilities. While it’s more diffi cult to attract new clients in troubled economic times, this is counterbalanced by an increase in existing member loyalty and usage, with more frequent attendance of the gym. Perhaps also spurred by the recession,


Spain has recently experienced the birth of low-cost facilities. In our opinion, this will have the following eff ects: fi rst, an increase


Premium clubs such as Holmes Place and Metropolitan (above) must offer perceived value for money


in the number of people participating in fi tness, with the base of the pyramid becoming wider – a positive step forward for the sector - and second, we expect a clear split or polarisation to occur in the market, as has already been witnessed in markets such as the UK, with low-cost versus premium clubs. Higher prices at the


Ask the experts: Raising membership fees


What’s the best way to raise membership fees, and how often should it be done? Brad Wilkins, vice president and general manager of Cooper Fitness Center/Cooper Spa in Dallas, Texas, US, offers his views:


In my experience, there are typically two reasons clubs will raise fees. The first is to pass on any operational burden to the consumer. The second is due to increased perceived value through club improvements (eg capital improvements, product and/or service offerings, etc). Our goal as club operators should be to


do both, and you should address how you are going to accomplish this goal through your annual strategic planning process.


24 I’m one who typically


favours annual fee increases, although you must have both internal (inside the club) and external (outside the club) economic stability. For example, for most operators, raising fees during the recent (external) recession was not a realistic option, we were just trying to hold on during this challenging economic time and mitigate our losses by controlling expenses. But as the external economy stabilises,


club operators that have focused on maintaining internal economic stability, and who have focused on increasing


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


premium clubs will now, more than ever, need to be clearly linked to a perception of value for money that the products and services provide. T is piece was excerpted from The IHRSA European Health Club Report: Size & Scope of the Fitness Industry, which was published in October 2013.


Should health clubs raise their fees annually if the economy allows?


perceived value should be primed to get back on track with a strategic and progressive fees structure format.


Read more answers to this question at www.ihrsa.org/industryleader


March 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


©WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/PHOTOGRAPHEE.EU


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102