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REG LITTLE


Fire Engine and representatives of civilian and armed services were all in attendance.”


In 1943 Reg helped in rescue attempts after the


‘Valentines Day Bombing’ that partially destroyed Duke Street in Dartmouth, leaving 13 dead and injuring 40. “One Saturday morning I was in


Reg married Sheila in 1950 and started their family –


Robert was born in 1952 and Peter in 1955. So why has Reg decided to put down his memories on


line now? “I’ve always collected together


Lower Contour Road and heard planes. I saw bombs dropping on Duke Street and the Town Arms pub (now council flats next to what was Dartmouth Primary School) in Higher Street. I went across to Dartmouth with our attachment,” he said. “There was also money all over the place. We picked it all up and gave it back – if I’d known then what we know now about bankers I would have kept some!” Reg met his future wife Sheila when he was 16 and she was 15. He said: “I used to follow her up the road after


One Saturday morning I was in Lower Contour Road and heard planes.


I saw bombs dropping on Duke Street and the Town Arms pub


memories and mementos,” said Reg, “but it was good to find out people were genuinely interested. I’ve done talks at local schools and to the local historians. My son helped us get everything online and apparently the site gets thousands of hits. The world has changed so much, I think people are pleased to find out


about what went on. For someone with so little brains I’m pleased I can help people understand what things were


like back then!” interview by Phil Scoble


church, but eventually I was accepted!” During the War, the Free French were stationed in the village and Reg and Shelia got to know many of them, including a ‘deaf and dumb’ sailor, called Paul Bruckel. “Sheila, who had a deaf Aunt, communicated with him using signs. We were told he was the only deaf and dumb sailor who had served in the French Forces,” he said.


They also met General de Gaulle’s son Phillipe, who was stationed there, along with future French President Francois Mitterand. Reg joined the army when he reached the age of 18 and became part of the Royal Engineers – after training he saw a notice to join a team of deep-sea divers and decided he would give it a go as it ‘sounded interesting’. After finishing his training, he was put on a train bound across Europe, not knowing where he was going. “We were given 24 hours notice we were to be going on a train,” he said. “We stopped a number of times – on one break in Austria I bumped into my neighbour from Kingswear, Les Radford! Our final destination was Venice, where we ran a ferry service for American personnel. I spent one Christmas there and walked on ice in the lagoon. “After 18 months I returned and was sent to another place where they talk a foreign language: Stranraer in Scotland! They were dumping old ammo and even mustard gas in the sea and I met several men with burns from the gas. I was there as a diver in case anything went wrong.”


SPORTS INJURIES CLINIC PHYSIOTHERAPY & DARTMOUTH


KEVIN MATTHEWS MCSP I.I.S.T SRP F.A.Dip


“Over 14 year’s Hands-on experience in


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For more information or to book an appointment, call


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Member of The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy The International Institute of Sports Therapists and The Health Professions Council HPC No:- PH76151


MARK LOBB


New Shop in the Dartmouth Market (opens soon) 01803 770743 info@wildfooddevon.co.uk


FISH & GAME 83


Official 2012 Olympics Physio


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