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HISTORY


damage the resolve of Dart- mouth people to support the war effort – quite the opposite in fact. The efforts of the town’s people were nothing short of extraordinary in donating money to the war effort – they exceeded targets for fundraising virtually at every time of asking and in some style.


In 1941 a target was set


village. The Secret Services also saw Dartmouth as a convenient starting point for clandestine missions on the continent and many a small boat slipped out in the dead of night to deliver brave men to the beaches of France. The coastal forces used


The coastal forces used the Royal Dart Hotel in Kinsgwear as a base – it was code named HMS Cicala so it could be mentioned in reports without giving away its location.


to raise £2,000 towards a Spitfire for the RAF and £35,000 towards a motor launch for the navy. The town brought in £135,750. That’s the same as £5million today. Dartmouth and Kingswear were


asked to bring in £50,000 for 16 fighter planes in 1943 – and raised £93,000 – or £3.2 million today. The town was shaken again by bombings in February 1943 when three planes machine gunned the town and dropped two bombs on Duke Street and one in Higher Street.


Fourteen people died and many build- ings were ruined, including the Tudor House, a historical ‘gem’ according to reports that had to be pulled down. The Butterwalk was also damaged but was repaired. Kingswear became a home for the Free French, who used the harbour as a base for their Motor Torpedo Boat missions. General de Gaulle’s own son Philippe and future French President Francois Mitterand were among the men stationed at Brook Hill in the


the Royal Dart Hotel in Kinsgwear as a base – it was code named HMS Cicala so it could be


mentioned in reports without giving away its location. This didn’t stop the notorious Lord Haw Haw from declar- ing it ‘sunk’ during one of his infamous broadcasts. Dartmouth and Kingswear faced hardship and suffering during the war years, as many towns did around the country. Their resolve and determina- tion to remain steadfast in the face of this, is the perfect example of the attitude which allowed Britain to ‘Fight On Alone’. • by Phil Scoble


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