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20 THINGS TO DO


to build mud nests on cliff faces. Look out too for the sleek brown and white guillemot and the black-and- white-headed razorbill, sitting on the waves just offshore, and watch for them making deep dives as they hunt fish in the water below. Above the cliffs look out for kestrels, small birds of prey with tails fanned and wings beating rapidly as they hover overhead looking for small mammals such as voles and mice. For more information visit www.southwestcoastpath.com.


16


TORBAY STEAM FAIR kicks off on August 2nd


at Churston Showfields. The three-day event


is a great family day out and will showcase numerous steam engines that will be driving fairground rides, big saws, threshing drums and ploughs. Also on display will be a range of vintage and classic cars, motorbikes, commercial vehicles, tractors and old farm engines. Visitors will be able to browse the models and craft tent and the market stalls as well as watch demonstrations of rope making and metal forging. The old time fairground will feature Gallopers, Big Wheel, Dodgems and noah’s Ark along with a number of children’s rides and the air will be filled with tunes played on old fairground organs. Parrots and birds of prey will be on site and Cosmo the Clown will entertain the youngsters. Hungry fairgoers can fill their stomachs with nosh from a variety of catering trailers selling hearty favourites including pasties, jacket potatoes, beef burgers, roast pork baps and a selection of baguettes, while Branscombe Vale Brewery will serve an excellent selection of real ales and lagers. For more information visit www.torbaysteamfair.com.


17


Soak up the rich heritage of DARTMOUTH’S ST SAVIOUR’S CHURCH which was built


more than 680 years ago in 1327. The oldest part of the building is the illegally built Mayor’s Chapel on the western part of the nave. The South Door is one of the church’s great treasures with its medieval ironwork and is possibly the original portal. The beautiful screen is made of oak and was built in 1480. It is decorated with vine leaves, grapes and wheat, symbols of the church and of the Eucharist. The Pulpit is made of stone, not wood and is a fine piece of workmanship. The north West Case of the magnificent 1889 Bryeceson Organ is magnificent. This Rococo beauty was the case front of an earlier instrument, originally sited on the West Gallery. The Altar is uniquely beautiful. It dates from James I and may have replaced an older stone Altar dedicated in May 1318 AD by Bishop Stapledon of Exeter on his only visit to Dartmouth.


18 RACE on August 20th


Take part in some fruity fun in Totnes when the town holds its ANNUAL ORANGE . The popular event, which closes


the town centre roads for the morning and draws large crowds of spectators as well as adventurous


contestants, is run by the town’s Elizabethan Society. The races involve the contestants hurling an orange down the street and then racing after it – booting or throwing the fruit as they go. The winner is the person who crosses the finish line first with a recognisable piece of fruit that he or she can claim as the one they started with. The origins of the zany competition are unclear but legend has it that Sir Francis Drake dropped his basket of oranges on Fore Street and the locals chased them down the slope. The races kick off from the Market Square at 11am and coincides with the town’s Elizabethan Market, with plenty of goods and entertainment on offer.


19


Spend a morning browsing around AVON MILL GARDEN CENTRE near Loddiswell


before exploring the surrounding Avon Valley and nearby woodland, which provides a cool retreat in the summer. The garden centre has a selection of ornamental and fruit trees, shrubs, herbaceous and bedding plants, houseplants, bulbs, seeds and aquatic plants. It also boasts a coastal plant collection and sells a range of gardening essentials. Avon Mill also offers a selection of stylish house and garden accessories and don’t forget to drop into The Gallery project which sells local arts and crafts and Threads Boutique. The mill’s deli is housed in a restored stone barn and its shelves are heaving with foodie feasts. If all that shopping has left you hungry, drop into the child, baby and dog friendly café at Avon Mill, set in the original mill, for delicious breakfasts, brunches, coffee, lunches, homemade cakes and Devon cream teas. The café also opens on the last Friday of every month for candlelit suppers. Above the café is an art gallery showing original and limited edition artworks, and keep an eye out for the pop up shops which regularly frequent the café’s top floor. For information and directions visit www.avonmill. com or phone 01548 550338.


20


Dubbed Devon’s friendliest day out, the multi- award winning PENNYWELL FARM


NEAR BUCKFASTLEIGH is the biggest of its kind in the South West with lots to do for the whole family. Every day is packed full of fun at the farm with a host of activities laid on from daily miniature pig racing; shows; falconry displays; and Red Rocket, tractor and trailer rides. Children can also have fun in the farm’s undercover and outdoor play areas and get up close with the animals including rabbits, alpacas, goats, ferrets, ponies, deer, hedgehogs, ducks, tortoises and even a reindeer. On August 7th


Pennywell will host the national Qualifier


Sheep Dog Trials, when more than 40 sheepdogs will be put through their paces. For more information and directions visit www.pennywellfarm.co.uk or phone 01364 642023.•


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