This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
20 THINGS TO DO


inquisitive watch skilled glass blowers and blacksmiths in the craft centre, browse through local artwork and see artists’ work on display in the Kitchen gallery, take a journey back in time in the Tudor rose garden or explore the walled art garden. If all this activity leaves you peckish, enjoy a spot of lunch at Cockington Court Tea Rooms or your own picnic in the open air. Cockington Court is free to enter and hosts a programme of events throughout the year – for more information visit www.cockingtoncourt. org


13 14


Marvel at the wonders of underwater sea life from the comfort of PLYMOUTH AQUARIUM,


the biggest in Britain. The aquarium comprises a total of 50 live exhibits including three massive tanks. The biggest holds 2.5million litres of water and is Britain’s deepest tank. It contains more than 4,000 animals from 400 species are displayed in realistic habitats from local shorelines to coral reefs. The aquarium also features interactive exhibits, a new 4D film, soft play area and café. For more information visit www.national-aquarium.co.uk.


How about exploring South Devon via a TREASURE TRAIL. Suitable for adults and


children, treasure trails are treasure hunts which help you explore villages, towns and cities in a fun and different way. Each Trail includes an easy to follow route which will take you to the most interesting and beautiful sights in that location. Along the way are clues to solve with the answers located on monuments, buildings and structures – some are easy to find while others are fiendishly tricky! Each Trail can be completed in your own time and at your own pace and you can choose to go on a treasure hunt, solve a murder mystery or crack the code to save the world on a spy mission. At £5, Treasure Trails are affordable family fun. Local Treasure Trails are available from Dartmouth Tourist Information Centre and for Dartmouth, Salcombe, Totnes, Kingsbridge, Bigbury-on-Sea, Brixham, Cockington, Paignton, Torquay, Ivybridge, Plym Valley, Plymouth and Plymouth Waterfront.


Stroll past HALLSANDS, ‘the village that fell into the sea,’ during a 3.5-mile circular WALK starting and ending at Beesands Seafront Car Park.


15 It’s easy to


understand the massive power of the sea on a windy day at Hallsands when the waves crash against the rocks and there is the muted roar of shingle being dragged back and forth on the seabed. In 1891 there were 159 people living in 37 cottages stretched along the rocky platform above the pebbly beach, most of them crab fishermen and their families. Within 30 years the sea had claimed the village, with some help from local dredgers and the villagers had abandoned their homes and rehoused in cottages across the valley. The cliffs above Hallsands are home to a breeding colony of several hundred kittiwakes that live out at sea but return to the coast in the summer


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148