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LOW & NO CHLORINE SEAL Salt Monitor


SEAL Pool Equipment first launched its popular range of salt water chlorinators, the CL series for residential facilities. They have also recently developed the SEAL Pup, a chlorinator for small pools and spas. Reverse polarity, low salt and water flow alarms, manual and automatic settings, electrode monitoring are some of the common features to all SEAL chlorinators.


By using cutting edge technology, together with quality material, SEAL always ensure that customers benefit from the best products with original design, great performance and reliability, all at affordable prices. The process requires the pool or spa to have a salt concentration of between 3 and 6 g/l. This is still classified as fresh water (by comparison sea water contains 20 g/l of salt on average).


As the pool water passes between the chlorinator’s plates, the electrolysis takes place; The SEAL chlorinator converts the chlorine in the salt (sodium chloride) into ‘chlorine’. This production of ‘chlorine’ is released in a safe and controlled way. The ‘chlorine’ is used to sterilise the pool and, in doing so, returns to salt in the process. This process is continually repeated therefore the salt is recycled.


Benefits include crystal clear water for a better look and feel, and no more red eyes, green hair, dry irritated skin or smell of chlorine. Designed for easy inspection and cleaning, the system is easy to operate. UV sanitation leaves no additives, no smell and no active pathogens in swimming pools. The method is highly effective at destroying chlorine-resistant microorganisms like Cryptosporidium and Giardia. UV treatment of pool water is also a great way to improve existing pool treatment. Another very welcome plus is that UV disinfection destroys combined chlorines (chloramines) in swimming pools.


Certikin’s Trident Commercial UV System


Topline’s Ultraviolet Generation With ten years of experience in the manufacturing of low pressure UV, Topline Electronics of Hailsham in the UK, are very well placed to explain the overall benefits of UV, but are always quick to point out that UV is not a replacement for chlorine. When discussing the alternatives to chlorination of a pool ultraviolet generation (UV), having now been a mainstream water treatment solution for a decade, will likely be suggested. It’s important to be clear with the client that ultraviolet generation (UV) is not an alternative to chlorine. In terms of minimising


Topline’s Low Pressure UV Generator


Certikin’s Blue Lagoon Domestic UV System


chlorine use UV can reduce the amount of free chlorine that is measured in a typical pool by up to 50%, but since UV has no residual effect outside the UV chamber in the plant room the pool requires an additional residual disinfectant to minimise cross infection between bathers.


Photo-oxidisation through UV generation reduces the amount of dilution required to remove unwanted combined chlorine compounds from the pool and will also inactivate the microorganisms that chlorine cannot easily remove, such as cryptosporidium. A typical pool can reduce the free chlorine residual from 1.5 ppm to around 0.8 ppm, which does generally result in an improved user experience, both in the pool and the pool surround atmosphere.


Commercial And Domestic UV From Certikin Certikin’s TridentTM


ultraviolet raises the


bar with the introduction of the Series 1 Ultraviolet sanitation system.


56 June 2013 SPN www.swimmingpoolnews.co.uk


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