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LOW & NO CHLORINE


What’s The Alternative?


FOR SOME, THE USE OFCHLORINE IS AN ONGOING DEBATE BUT WHILE IT CONTINUES, EVERY YEAR, MORE REDUCED CHLORINE AND CHLORINE FREE PRODUCTS BECOME AVAILABLE. SO IS THE FUTURE CHLORINE FREE? WE TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT THE LATEST SYSTEMS AND SANITISERS THAT ARE DRIVING DOWN CHLORINE USE By Karen Witney


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t has often been said that chlorine is the only truly effective sanitiser and that there is no other satisfactory alternative way of keeping pools completely clean and safe.


However, more and more methods of treatment that significantly reduce the need for chlorine are gaining in popularity, due, in the main to consumer demands. There are now a number of water treatments and systems on the market that are considered to be a safe substitute or partial substitute for chlorine without compromising on hygiene or water quality.


Waterco’s Refreshing Electrochlor The Electrochlor salt water pool chlorinator from Waterco will automatically maintain the chlorine level of a pool and is plumbed directly in-line with the pool equipment, typically after the heater. Electrochlor consists of a power pack (to supply power to the cell) and a Salt Cell (where chlorine is produced). The Automated Power Pack monitors and controls chlorine production by regulating the amount of electrical energy supplied to the salt cell. The Electrochlor’s Long Life Salt Cell consists of a series of titanium electrodes with opposite charges. Electrochlor’s clear salt cell housing allows visual inspection of the salt cell plates and enables monitoring of chlorine production. The cell housing is constructed using clear UV stabilised acrylic. Both anode and cathode of the self-clean chlorinator are made from uniquely coated titanium mesh to add extra durability and life. Electrochlor’s self-clean salt cell has the added ability to reverse the polarity of the voltage to clean calcium build-up from its electrodes. Once an Electrochlor is installed and the desirable salt level is achieved, salt needs only to be added occasionally to replace any water loss e.g. splash out, evaporation or backwashing.


The Electrochlor Chlorinator requires a salt content of 4,000 – 6,500 parts per million (‘ppm’) in the pool (ocean water has a salt content of around 35,000 ppm and humans have a salt taste threshold of around 3,500


www.swimmingpoolnews.co.uk SPN June 2013 55


ppm). Swimming in a mild saline solution is much like taking a shower in soft water. In a salt-water pool (one with an Electrochlor) the water feels silky, skin feels smooth and the experience is more refreshing.


ATG Ultraviolet Disinfection Treatment With industry regulations becoming more stringent and the increasing threat of chemically resistant strains of micro- organisms, it is important to choose a UV system manufacturer who you can trust. With state-of-the-art technology and a wealth of industry experience, atg UV have the expertise to provide effective, cost efficient and validated (US EPA UVDGM & DWI 2010 Guidelines) ultraviolet disinfection and treatment solutions for a vast range of applications, treating flows of up to 5,000


atg UV US EPA UVDGM Validated UV system


/hr in a single compact, high output UV system. Ultraviolet disinfection is now an established method of water treatment for municipal pools, and has become the preferred treatment choice for a number of leading international leisure brands and new-build or renovated swimming pools. There are typically two types of UV systems available; traditional axial UV systems with inlets and outlets at either end of the chamber that offer swimming pool operators increased flexibility for retrofits or replacement of existing UV systems. For new modern facilities or where restricted plant room space is an issue, ultra efficient in-line UV systems are favoured. In-line UV systems can be installed directly into the pipe work and offer a much smaller footprint and increased efficiency and performance.


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