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your needs. Don’t fall into the trap of using online translation tools – they generally only translate word by word, and the resulting translation reads as gibberish to a native speaker.


OPEN THE DOOR Communicating effectively with residents can make managing


and living in a multifamily community easier for everyone involved. Managers can eliminate confusion and frustration when it comes to common community issues, and when residents feel well informed of community goings-on and policies, they’re unlikely to have cause for complaints and more likely to develop a favorable opinion of the property that they’ll share with family and friends. Open, consistent communication is vital to increasing resident satis- faction and compliance.


Do you have a media issue ir question? Contact Aimee for assistance. She can be reached at 713-595-0302 or at aarrington@haaonline.org.


LEGISLATIVE, continued from Page 9


and you did everything you reasonably could to reduce the water usage over which you do have control. Also, the ordinance sets a very reasonable maximum of 4,000 gal- lons/unit/month for a Stage 4 shortage – especially considering that large single-family homes are limited to the same 4,000 gallons. One possible problem, though, is that many properties have multiple meters serving different configurations of units, laundry rooms, boilers, etc. We argued that – as with “umbrella billing” already allowed under city ordinance – the 4,000 gallon number should apply to the property as a whole. This would avoid the problem of a meter that serves two laundry rooms and two units triggering an undeserved penalty. In fairness, a Stage 4 water shortage would be a pretty extreme


event. Owners would probably have far more pressing issues to worry about (cracked slabs, the lack of water to fight fires, etc.) than water bill surcharges. Still, it is important to remind city leaders that owners can only control the things they’re allowed by law to con- trol. In a severe drought, owners, residents and all citizens will need to pull together to conserve our precious water resources.


If you have a regulatory problem or question, call the HAA main line at 713-595-0300 and ask for Aimee or Andy in Government Affairs.


HAA’s Andy Teas and Buzz Elton, Galveston County Apartment Association (right), present a check on behalf of the NAAPAC to Congressman Ted Poe (R-District 2) at a meeting in Galveston in June.


ABODE AUGUST 2012 29


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