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Kent CPFA recognised as outstanding


At the recent County Playing Field Associa- tions’ (CPFA) annual conference, Kent CPFA was officially recognised by the Sport and Play Construction Association (SAPCA) for its out- standing contribution in developing sports and play facilities across the county. Under the secretarial guidance of Paul Pea-


cock, Kent CPFA has been instrumental in the development of the Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge within the county, with more than 50 parish councils signed up to the initiative. The Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge, head-


ed by its Patron Prince William, is a fantastic programme that aims to protect 2,012 playing fields in communities across the country as a permanent living legacy of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the London 2012 Olympics. Membership of Kent CPFA has also increased


by 100 as a result of an initiative that secured the support of all major sporting bodies across the county – including the Kent FA, Kent Rugby


Paul Peacock, secretary of Kent CPFA (right) collects his award from SAPCA CEO Chris Trickey


Union and various associations for tennis, squash, cricket, athletics and hockey. Through the sup- port of these bodies, awareness of Kent CPFA has risen significantly. Commenting on the award, Peacock said: “The willingness of our trustees to adapt and change, and to support me in the changes that we have made at Kent CPFA is very much appreciated. It’s their support that has been instrumental in us winning this award.”


The Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge protects playing fields across the country


Membership update New technical manager joins SAPCA


SAPCA has appointed Mike Cox as its new technical manager. He will take responsibility for the association’s technical and education programmes, as well as quality assurance initia- tives – including SAPCA’s new Pitch and Track Registration Scheme. Commenting on the appointment, Chris Trick-


ey, CEO of SAPCA, said: “Mike will be pivotal in driving the programme forward to ensure quality and standards continue to be raised across the


industry. He has a perfect background for this – having had personal experience in designing and building sports and play facilities.” Cox started his career as a landscape archi-


tect – working on projects such as Kuwait Parks in Kuwait City and the Silver Jubilee Walk in London Docklands. From there he became an award-winning golf course architect – working on numerous golf course designs and restora- tion projects. For the past 10 years, Cox has worked as a


project manager and has been involved in a di- verse range of projects – from the restoration of part of the Trans-Pennine Way, ecological work for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds to the Kings Cross redevelopment and latterly on park and infrastructure projects in Stratford, London in time for the Olympic and Paralympic Games this summer.


Mike Cox will help SAPCA to raise standards in sport and play facility construction


70 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


SAPCA welcomes two companies to its growing list of members: ● Telford-based Citadel Security Products Ltd provides integrated se- curity and fencing systems to the sports and leisure market. ● Roberts Limbrick is a national, award-winning architectural practice that has been involved in a range of sports and leisure projects. The practice has worked on high-profile projects such as Stoke Mandeville Stadium, the Wales Na- tional Pool, Stroud Rugby Club and a new grandstand at Epsom Racecourse.


Roberts Limbrick has also worked on Mile End Leisure Centre in London


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