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ENERGY FOR MAJOR EVENTS


ENERGY BOOST for London 2012


Aggreko’s head of Olympics business, Robert Wells, discusses the company’s long-term commitment to the IOC and its development of skills and equipment that will contribute to the Olympic legacy


F


or Aggreko, a supplier of tem- porary power and temperature control solutions and the Official Temporary Energy Services Pro-


vider to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, the 31 days of sport- ing competition is just one chapter of a much longer story. The vastness of the Games is clear from


the numbers involved: 15,000 athletes from 205 nations will be watched by a global TV audience of four billion viewers. And Aggreko is making its own contribu- tion to these statistics by providing more than 260 MW of power, 500 generator sets, 1,500km of cable and 4,500 distribu- tion panels to the Games. It’s the biggest deployment of temporary power for a single sporting event ever in the UK with Aggreko’s technology providing prime or back-up power at each of the 54 venues.


Aggreko’s transformers and generators were transported to London by rail


The event will be the culmination of


two years’ work by the company. While the headlines have been focusing on ath- letes qualifying for London 2012, behind the scenes, Aggreko’s Olympics began in earnest in 2011 when it was named as the exclusive supplier of temporary en- ergy services to the event. Since then, the systems have been put in place and were fully operational months in advance of the Olympic opening ceremony – via two dedicated operation centres close to the Olympic Park.


Testing testing… Leading up to the Games, Aggreko en- gineers and event management experts supported the ‘London Prepares’ series of major international sports events, which enabled the London Games’ Or- ganising Committee (LOCOG) to test key aspects of operational readiness. The programme of events was hosted at a series of sports venues to test systems, operational approaches and procedures. The first phase


of test events was successfully com- pleted in 2011, with Aggreko providing temporary power and engineering sup- port at Horse Guards Parade for beach vol- leyball and at Eton Dorney – the venue for rowing and ca- noe sprints. Aggreko has since supported LOCOG


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at events within the major venues in the Olympic Park, including the Velodrome and the Hockey Centre. In addition, the company also provided temporary power to test all Olympic venue systems, as part of the commissioning process.


Bespoke requirements These test events enabled the Aggreko team to work with LOCOG on design solutions to meet individual require- ments and to work with venue teams to build good working relationships at an operational level. Horse Guards Parade, for example, has limited space avail- able and restricted access routes, which required close coordination with other contractors. In Greenwich Park, there is a requirement to be sensitive to the histori- cal surroundings and limit any potential impact on local residents. London 2012 is a major reason for Ag-


greko’s £350m capital investment in new fleet this year. More than 170 generators, manufactured at Aggreko’s new £22m manufacturing facility in Dumbarton, and 11 transformers were being trans- ported to London by train to support LOCOG’s commitment to minimise envi- ronmental impact. The new temporary power equipment used at the Games will then be utilised immediately afterwards at a number of other locations. Aggreko’s specialist engineering team


has brought a wealth of experience to the project – gained from working on major international sports events – such as the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic Games.


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


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