This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
London’s oldest royal park contains Roman


remains, rare acid grass- land and 300 sweet


chestnut trees which had to be preserved


PROJECT STATISTICS


• 4,000 Kg of acid grassland seed collected and redistributed within the park to enhance habitats • 182 holes per m2 put into the ground using vertidrain = 12,740,000 across the course per operation x 8 operations in 2011 = 101,920,000 holes in the track so far • 11,500 man hours inputted into preparing the track so far


• 225,000 litres of water saved by using recycled water to clean maintenance equipment • 40 tonnes of woodchip used to protect veteran tree roots and donated to the park • 7,800 kg of grass seed used on track and warm up areas • EventDeck supplied 25,000sq m of ArmorDeck 1 for pedestrian walkways


Sports Pitches


Get it right first time


The ideal foundation for soil-based pitches


during the work undertak- en at the site by employing mats and mulches for pro- tection. Each horse jump was also constructed on top of the ground, rather than dug into it. A tailor-made GPS sys-


tem, used for the first time in the UK, was developed to track work vehicles around the park, with an accuracy of 2cm, to ensure that approved routes were followed. A comprehensive database of information recorded the precise movements of each vehicle in the park on a daily basis and ensured that maps, highlighting areas of constraint, were strictly adhered to. We also recorded the type and quan-


• Complies to BS3882:2007


• Derived from prime arable soil, not muckaway


• Comprehensive analysis


• Consistent, single-source product


The course enhances the park’s natural surroundings


has helped us make informed decisions on maintaining the course. Depending on the prevalent climatic conditions from day to day, up to 300,000 litres of water has been applied to the course on a daily basis.


tity of fertiliser used throughout the project with turf samples regularly analy- sed at STRI laboratory headquarters.


MAINTAINING EXCELLENCE This project has proven to be a unique challenge – in terms of its sheer scale and the sensitivities of operating within London’s oldest royal park. However, feedback from some of the riders at the venue’s test event, held in July 2011, has been very positive. The course is now ready for the Games


and STRI is currently involved in main- taining the site to ensure that everything stays perfect. An on-site weather station


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


BEYOND THE GAMES STRI is contracted to remain on site until the end of 2015 and will implement a comprehensive legacy programme for the park following the Games. This will ensure that the park is completely re- stored to its original condition for park inhabitants and visitors and that the additional 2.3 hectares of rare acid grass- lands will stay insitu. The high profile of the Games, the


varied stakeholders involved and the scale of the project has proven a career highlight for me. It has been three years’ hard work, although admittedly in very beautiful surroundings. ●


For repairing


high wear areas and as a maintenance dressing


Call us now on:


0870 240 2314 www.bstopsoil.co.uk


Landscape20 and Sports10 are registered trademarks of British Sugar plc


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84