This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
COMPREHENSIVE OLYMPIC COVERAGE In a similar attempt to spur interest among younger viewers in the Games, international broadcasters and official London 2012 corporate partners are in- corporating social elements into their Olympics plans to capitalise on the chat- ter surrounding the event. In the lead up to the Games, the BBC


and Comcast’s NBCUniversal have col- laborated with Facebook on Olympics programming. The BBC plans to live stream coverage of the Games through the social site, while the US broadcaster will post Olympics-related news, interactive polls, photos and other exclusive content to Fa- cebook users who ‘like’ the page. Both broadcasters see social media as a


viable channel to drive a bigger audience to tune in to their traditional television


coverage. The BBC’s enhanced video ex- perience will give access to up to 24 live, high-definition streams and 2,500 hours of coverage via the BBC Sport website. A free Olympics app is also available, which will allow global audiences to access the BBC’s Olympics content on the go. NBC, meanwhile, will be live stream-


ing up to 3,500 programming hours of Olympic events on its website. It will not broadcast live video of the Games to Face- book, instead, the broadcaster’s Facebook partnership will influence on-air cover- age, with Facebook employees working with NBC producers to create programmes about the results, athletes and other Olym- pic-inspired stories. The official Games partners are also busy


preparing social extensions for their adver- tising campaigns in a bid to get the most out of their Olympic sponsorships. Visa, for example, is tapping Facebook and Twit- ter for its global marketing campaign to encourage fans to cheer for the athletes it sponsors during the Games.


ATHLETE ENGAGEMENT Perhaps one of the most obvious uses of social media within the Games is for fans to make contact with their sports idols,


teams and sports. To this effect, the IOC is using social media to drive athlete awareness and sees it as an important tool to deliver information to the media and other stakeholders. It enables fans and athletes to meet, discuss and ulti- mately share the Olympic values which, the IOC claims, aim to improve lives through sport – throughout the year, not just at Games time. With this in mind, the IOC has launched


the Olympic Athletes’ Hub, a directory of certified Olympians, after it witnessed the growth of social media activity at the Vancouver 2010 Games. This is a social con- nector of conversations between athletes and fans aimed at developing deeper and more inspiring relationships. The commission has its own Twitter and


Facebook feeds – including a dedicated media account – which are updated in vari- ous languages, and also logged more than 16.7 million video views last year alone on its dedicated Olympic YouTube channels. The IOC has also created a community


on foursquare – rewarding users with a competition that will result in a trip to the Games. Olympic Day on 23 June was the catalyst for this contest, which asked us- ers to follow the Olympics on foursquare


There will be opportunities for Games organisers to utilise social media in ways that will add value to the event while engaging people like never before


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


47


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84