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RESEARCH


New research carried out by professional services provider Deloitte has found that London’s staging of the Olympic Games is generating a “significant boost” for Brand Britain. Heather Hancock, lead London 2012 partner at Deloitte, reports


What happens next? Capitalising on London 2012


A


n exciting and inspiring sum- mer of sport lies ahead and the stage is set for a wonder- ful event, but while medals


are yet to be awarded, focus has been on post-Games legacy from the earliest days of the London 2012 bid. When Olympic legacy is discussed, the


conversation often focuses on sport- specific themes. Are participation rates increasing? Has the quality and availability of facilities improved? This is understand- able; the Olympic and Paralympic Games are sporting events after all. To restrict our gaze to sport, howev-


er, misses the scale of ambition that lay behind London’s bid for these Games. Hosting the Olympic and Paralympic Games in the 21st century requires such a vast mobilisation of resources that their legacy reaches far beyond sport. This is most visible in the social and economic re- generation of the East End of London. The impetus of London 2012 has accelerated the regeneration of the Lower Lea Valley – home to some of the most lagging districts in the country – by at least a generation.


A report from the London Mayor’s


office published last year found that, as a result of winning the Games, the Westfield Stratford City development went ahead years earlier than planned, creating 10,000 permanent jobs. This is in addition to the thousands of jobs created on the park itself through the construction of Games facilities and the post-Games regeneration of the site. The Games are the biggest single


showcase for British business in decades. With hundreds of thousands of overseas visitors to the UK, millions of tickethold- ers coming to the Olympic Park and a TV audience in the billions, the Games repre- sent a unique opportunity for UK plc to make its mark. A successful sports event will be no-


ticed by consumers, businesses and governments around the world giving British companies, whether they have directly provided goods or services to London 2012 or they haven’t, the oppor- tunity to capitalise on this moment in the spotlight and become part of the London 2012 legacy.


42 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


Six weeks of sport; decades of regeneration London 2012 has already provided British business with the opportunity to be part of a multi-billion pound mega-project, both in the creation of the park itself and in the delivery of the Games. The impact of this should not be overstated: it equates to around £1bn a year of work over the last six years. British businesses will also play a critical


role in putting on the show. Around 600 companies are providing goods or ser- vices to the Games, with hundreds more having tendered for work through the ‘Compete For’ website. With more than 95 per cent of contracts now awarded, 70 per cent of suppliers are small and me- dium enterprises. London 2012 has also helped to


safeguard and sustain infrastructure in- vestment. None more significant than the huge investment in transport systems to the East End, such as the East London Line. Cast your mind back to the sight of


the planned Olympic Park in 2005. It was obscured by a cat’s cradle of power


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