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COPPER BOX


handball modern pentathlon


• architect: MAKE


• lead contractor: Buckingham Group Contracting


• sports architect: PTW • detailed design: Populous • engineers: Arup


• structural engineer: Sinclair Knight Merz


The multi-sport (Copper Box) arena will host the handball events


This iconic venue is extremely flexible, with retractable seating that can change the floor size to facilitate different activi- ties both during and after the Games.


DESIGN AND BUILD Designed with sustainability as a priority, the roof is fitted with 88 light pipes that al- low natural light into the venue, reducing electric light demand, which will achieve annual energy savings of up to 40 per cent. Rainwater is collected from the roof to flush toilets and also reduce water use at the venue by up to 40 per cent.


The glazed concourse level that en-


circles the building allows visitors to see the sport taking place inside and il- luminates the venue when lit at night. The top half of the venue is clad in


3,000sq m of (mostly recycled) external copper cladding to give the venue a unique appearance that will develop a rich natural colour as it ages.


AFTER THE GAMES The Copper Box will be operated by GLL and will become a multi-use sports centre for community use,


• synthetic flooring for goal ball/handball/ goalposts: Mondo


athlete training and events. Its flex- ible design and retractable seating will allow for activities ranging from international competition to commu- nity sports, and for a wide range of indoor sports – including basketball, handball, badminton, boxing, martial arts, netball, table tennis, wheelchair rugby and volleyball. A health and fitness club with chang-


ing facilities and a café is also planned. Temporary areas, used for the media and technology equipment, will be converted to provide extra spectator facilities.


WEYMOUTH AND PORTLAND sailing


GREENWICH PARK


equestrian modern pentathlon


Greenwich Park is London’s old- est Royal Park, dating back to 1433, and is part of the Greenwich World Heritage site and home to the Prime Meridian Line.


Located on the south coast of England, Weymouth and Portland provides some of the UK’s best natural sailing waters.


DESIGN AND BUILD The site already had world-class sail- ing facilities, but enhancements were needed to ensure the venue was suitable for the Games. These included a perma- nent 250m slipway used for launching and landing boats and 70 new moorings. A new commercial 560-berth marina has also been built nearby and 250 of these berths will be used during the Games.


AFTER THE GAMES The National Sailing Academy will ben- efit from the improvements, providing a state-of-the-art facility for elite training, competition and community use.


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


DESIGN AND BUILD A temporary course has been de- signed by STRI for the cross-country element of the eventing competi- tion, while a temporary main arena is also being built in front of the Queen’s House within the grounds of the National Maritime Museum. Work began on the temporary


main arena in April 2012. It fea- tures an innovative, purpose-made platform, devised by WS Atkins and made from plywood, aluminium and steel and which is held above ground by more than 2,000 pillars. The 5.7km cross-country course


will feature more than 42 jumps and see riders and horses tackle water obstacles, slopes and hills.


AFTER THE GAMES All structures installed within the park will be removed. The park will continue to be used for a wide range of recreation and leisure activities.


Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital 41


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