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LONDON 2012 SPORTS VENUES ETON MANOR


aquatics training (Olympic and Paralympic) wheelchair tennis


• architect: Stanton Williams • engineers: Arup • fencing: B&L Fencing Services • lighting: Abacus


• main contractors: Mansell Construction Services; PJ Careys; Slick Seating Systems; Mitie Engineering A&T; Nussli


ETON DORNEY


canoe sprint rowing (Olympic and Paralympic)


Set in a 400-acre park within a nature conservation area, 25 miles west of London, Eton Dorney Rowing Centre at Dorney Lake is acclaimed as one of the finest rowing venues in the world.


The six outdoor wheelchair tennis courts have been designed in a striking blue colour


Built on the site of the old Eton Manor Sports Club, Eton Manor is the only new, permanent, London 2012 Paralympic ven- ue. It features four indoor and six outdoor wheelchair tennis competition courts and has three 50m pools for swimmers, and smaller pools for synchronised swimmers with water polo players.


DESIGN AND BUILD After the site had been cleared, it was first used as the temporary home for a practical training centre, , which trained people in operating construction ma- chinery. Many of the graduates from the centre went on to get jobs on the park.


In 2009, the centre moved to a perma-


nent home near the Royal Docks in East London, so that the site could be pre- pared for the construction of the new facilities.


AFTER THE GAMES The facility will be owned, managed and funded by Lee Valley Regional Park Au- thority. The area will be transformed into sporting facilities for the local communi- ty, including a tennis centre and a hockey centre, which will use the two hockey pitches relocated from the temporary Riv- erbank Arena. There will also be space for 10 potential five-a-side football pitches.


DESIGN AND BUILD The venue has a 2,200m, eight-lane rowing course, warm-up lanes and competition facilities. Although the facilities were already world-class, im- provements were needed to ensure the venue met the particular require- ments of the Games. An additional cut-through has been


created at the 1,400m mark to allow competitors to get from the return lane to the competition course. Previ- ously the only cut-through was at the 600m mark. Two bridges have also been installed. The first spans the new cut-through, while the other has re- placed the existing finish line bridge with a wider one.


AFTER THE GAMES Eton Dorney will continue to be used as a world-class training and competi- tion facility for rowing.


ROYAL ARTILLERY BARRACKS shooting


DESIGN AND BUILD The temporary London 2012 venue at The Royal Artillery Barracks has been designed with 18,000sq m of PVC mem- brane that gives the outer structures their unique appearance. The vibrantly-coloured openings on


the white façade help create tension in the membrane and provide natural venti- lation and light. Unlike most previous Games, shooting


competitors will be close to the heart of the action, enabling athletes to stay with their teammates in the Olympic Village. Three temporary indoor ranges for pis-


tol and rifle shooting (a 25m, combined 50m/10m and a finals range) have been built together with outdoor shotgun ranges for trap and skeet events. There will be temporary spectator grandstands at each Shooting range.


The shooting ranges and grandstands


offer a stunning backdrop of the Bar- racks’ beautiful 18th century architecture.


AFTER THE GAMES The venue will be dismantled and the site returned to its original condition, after which it will be handed back to the Min- istry of Defence, which is the landowner.


40 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


A temporary shooting range and the building’s ‘puckered’- design exterior (below)


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