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LONDON 2012 SPORTS VENUES


LORDS’ CRICKET GROUND archery


LEE VALLEY WHITEWATER CENTRE canoe slalom


• architect: FaulknerBrowns Architects


• lead contractor: Morrison Construction


Temporary seating will allow for close-up views


Lord’s Cricket Ground has been a venue for top-class sport since the late 19th century. Now the home ground of Middlesex County Cricket Club, the venue regularly hosts both test match- es and one-day international matches.


DESIGN AND BUILD At Games time, archers will shoot from the front of the 19th century Pavilion across the hallowed cricket square towards the Media Centre. Although temporary structures such


as seating are being installed, compara- tively little preparation will be needed to get this venue ready for the Games.


AFTER THE GAMES Lord’s will return to its role as the home of cricket. Archery equipment from the training, warm-up and competition venues will be donated to schools and archery clubs across the country.


HORSE GUARDS PARADE beach volleyball


Located in central London, Horse Guards Parade provides an iconic location for the London 2012 beach volleyball competition. Dating back to 1745, the parade


ground takes its name from the sol- diers who have provided protection for the monarch since the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. It lies at the heart of London’s ceremonial life and still hosts the Trooping of the Colour.


• structural and services engineers: Cundall White Water Course Specialists; Whitewater Parks International


• landscape designers: Michael van Valkenburgh Associates.


Canoeists at the recent canoe slalom test event in Lee Valley


The Lee Valley White Water Centre is located 30km north of the Olympic Park, on the edge of the 1,000-acre River Lee Country Park – part of the Lee Valley Regional Park. The centre has two separate courses:


a 300m Olympic-standard competi- tion course with a 5.5m descent, and a 160m intermediate/training course with a 1.6m descent.


DESIGN AND BUILD Both courses were built from scratch, along with a 10,000sq m lake. This feeds a system of pumps that provide the course with 15cu m of water per second. The white water is created by


• lighting: Abacus


these pumps and obstacles placed along the course. It opened in spring 2011 as the only newly-built London 2012 venue that the public have been able to use ahead of the Games.


AFTER THE GAMES The two courses and the facilities build- ing will remain, with the venue becoming a world-class canoeing and kayaking facil- ity for people of all abilities, and a major leisure attraction for white water rafting. After the Games, the venue will be


owned, funded and managed by Lee Val- ley Regional Park Authority and a sports development programme will be run in partnership with the British Canoe Union.


TEMPORARY RIVERBANK ARENA hockey


• surface specifications and testing: Labosport


• surface construction: Sports Technology International; Spadeoak


• fencing: B&L Fencing Services • sports equipment: Harrod


The blue pitch with pink surrounds is a first for an Olympic hockey event


The temporary Riverbank Arena has two pitches, one with spectator seat- ing and one for use as a warm-up area.


DESIGN AND BUILD London 2012 is the first Olympic Games where the hockey pitches aren’t green. Pink is used for the area surrounding the pitch and blue for the field of play


38 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


– making it easy to spot the yellow ball. The first Riverbank Arena pitch was unveiled in October 2011.


AFTER THE GAMES The pitches will join permanent sport- ing facilities at Eton Manor. It will have 3,000 permanent seats, increasing to up to 15,000 for major events.


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


PIC: ©POPULOUS


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