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LONDON 2012 SPORTS VENUES VELODROME


Cycling – track (Olympic and Paralympic)


Located in the north of the Olympic Park, the Velodrome is one of the Games’ most sustainable and iconic venues.


DESIGN AND BUILD Sustainable choices have been made wherever possible; from the sourcing of wood used on the track and exter- nal cladding, to the installation of a 100 per cent naturally-ventilated system that eliminates the need for air conditioning. The building exterior is clad in 5,000sq


m of western red cedar. Both this and the Siberian pine for the track were certi- fied by the Forest Stewardship Council. The cable-net roof design also reduced the amount of material required and de- creased construction time by 20 weeks. The building lets in an abundance of


natural light, reducing the amount of en- ergy needed for artificial lighting. Its roof collects rainwater that will reduce mains water usage by more than 70 per cent.


• architect: Hopkins • lead contractor: ISG plc • project manager: CLM • structural engineer: Expedition • services engineer: BDSP Partnership • track designer: Ron Webb


• cable net: Pfeifer with Schlaich Bergermann • roof covering: Kalzip • structural steel: Watsons


• concrete substructure and superstructure: Foundation Developments


• roof cassettes and external timber cladding: Wood Newton


The track, athlete flows and timing systems were tested at the recent UCI Track Cycling World Cup


The venue has the capacity for 6,000


spectators, with the seating split into two tiers. A glass wall around the perimeter, between the lower and upper tiers of seat- ing, offers a 360-degree view of the park. The venue’s designers worked closely


with a design panel, including Olympic gold medal-winning cyclist Sir Chris Hoy, to tailor the track geometry, temperature


• landscape: Grant Associates


and environmental conditions with the aim of creating a record-breaking track.


AFTER THE GAMES The venue will be handed over to the Lee Valley Regional Park Authority and, along with the BMX Track, will form the heart of a new VeloPark for use by the local community, clubs and elite athletes.


TEMPORARY BASKETBALL ARENA


basketball handball finals wheelchair basketball wheelchair rugby


• design team lead: SKM • architect: Wilkinson Eyre • sports architect: KSS • engineers: Arup


• structural engineer: Sinclair Knight Merz


• structural and mechanical, electrical, plumbing: (MEP) • sports equipment: Harrod


• fast break flooring system: Mondo


• main contractors: Barr Construction; Slick Seating Systems; Base, Mitie; Envirowrap; Volker Fitzpatrick; McAvo


The new Basketball Arena is one of the largest temporary venues ever built for an Olympic Games event. The arena will be one of the most


heavily-used venues within the Olym- pic Park, with competition events taking place almost every day.


DESIGN AND BUILD The venue’s frame is made up of 1,000 tonnes of steel and is covered in 20,000sq m of a recyclable white PVC fabric that will form the canvas for spectacular light- ing displays during the Games. On the inside, the venue features an array of black and orange seats; representing the colours of a basketball.


The Basketball Arena is 35m high and longer than a football pitch at 115m long Initial works started on the arena in


October 2009, and construction was completed on time and within budget in June 2011 – making it one of the quickest Olympic Park venues to be constructed: the arena’s giant frame was set up in less than three months. Behind the scenes, the arena shares some facilities with the Velodrome and


BMX Track to make efficient use of space and resources. This includes two courts in temporary accommodation and areas for catering, security, waste management and the media.


AFTER THE GAMES The arena will be taken down. Parts of it are expected to be reused elsewhere.


36 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


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