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LONDON 2012 SPORTS VENUES OLYMPIC STADIUM


Opening and Closing Ceremonies (Olympic and Paralympic) athletics


DESIGN AND BUILD Designed by Populous with legacy in mind, the Olympic Stadium’s 80,000 ca- pacity can be reduced after the Games. It has a permanent lower tier with a capac- ity of 25,000, and a temporary steel and concrete upper tier, for a further 55,000 spectators, which can be dismantled af- ter the Games. The temporary upper tier means that


amenities such as catering and toilets, normally found inside sports stadia, have been designed as individual pods, which are located in temporary facilities around the outside of the stadium. Facilities for athletes within the stadium


include changing rooms, medical support facilities and a 60m warm-up track. Factoring in the need for hosting the


opening and closing ceremonies, tripods are fixed on to the outer circle of steel that runs around the top of the stadium. These connect across the building to sup- port staging and the stadium foundations have been designed to take the strain.


Colourful gardens and lawns will provide an English Garden setting to the Olympic Park The frame of the building will be


clothed in a £7m wrap, made of individu- al pieces of fabric. Dow Chemical agreed to fund the wrap after government mon- ey for it was pulled in 2010 during the coalition government cutbacks. The most sustainable stadium ever


built for an Olympic Games, the lower tier sits within a bowl in the ground, which minimises the use of construc- tion materials. This bowl was created by excavating 800,000 tonnes of soil, the majority of which was cleaned and re- used elsewhere on the Olympic Park. Around 10,000 tonnes of steel was


used to build the venue – significantly less than in other Olympic stadiums. The top ring was built using surplus gas


pipes – a visual testament to efforts to ‘reduce, reuse and recycle’. The turf was grown in Scunthorpe from


a blend of perennial rye grass, smooth stalk meadow grass and fescue grass seeds.


AFTER THE GAMES The London Legacy Development Corpo- ration and Mayor of London have taken the decision to keep the stadium under public ownership. Its design is flexible enough to ac-


commodate a number of different requirements and capacities. It will retain athletics at its core, and also be a venue for other sporting, cultural and commu- nity events – including the venue for the 2015 IAAF World Championships.


• architect: Populous • lead contractor: Sir Robert McAlpine • engineer: Buro Happold


• landscape architects: Hyland Edgar Driver • groundwork: Keltbray • piling: Keller


• insitu and precast concrete: Byrne Brothers • roof fabric membrane: Seele • cable: Bridon Cables


• strand jacking: Fagioli • wind tunnel testing: BMT • bowl steelwork: Lee Warren • earth reinforcement: Tensar • topping: Careys • steel stairs: CMF • steelwork sub constractor: Watson Steel • athletics track: Mondo • sports surface maintenance: Replay


• surface specifications and testing: Labosport


During the Games, the stadium will seat 80,000 spectators at the Open and Closing Ceremonies and the athletics competitions


34 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


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