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Around 14,700 international athletes will compete within London 2012’s sports venues this summer


London 2012’s build-up and legacy will generate £16.5bn in gross domestic product for the UK economy, according to Lloyds Banking Group


Work started as soon as the ODA gained


possession of the park site in summer 2007, after obtaining advice from engi- neering design consultants WS Atkins on how to prepare the industrial wastelands. During the next 12 months, work


focused on preparing the site for de- velopment. The ODA then began constructing the main venues and infra- structure – known as the ‘big build’. This was completed on time and within bud- get by 27 July 2011 – one year ahead of the Olympic Games Opening Ceremony. The London 2012 Organising Com-


mittee (LOCOG) then had a year to add the overlay – such as timing systems and dressing – transforming the new facilities into venues ready for the Games.


AVOIDING WHITE ELEPHANTS Elsewhere in the country, sporting ven- ues have been enhanced or built from


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012 Throughout the


construction programme and Games planning, LOCOG has been


thinking of tomorrow


scratch, providing world-class facilities for the Games and for the long-term benefit of local communities and elite athletes. Existing world-famous stadia across the UK, including Hampden Park, Glasgow, and the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, are hosting the Football competition. Permanent venues have been con-


structed when there is a long-term need. If there was not, then temporary venues have been built. Existing landmark venues


such as Wimbledon and Lord’s Cricket Ground are also being used. Elsewhere, landmark sites, including


Horse Guards Parade and Greenwich Park, have been transformed – providing spec- tacular settings for sporting events and showcasing the UK’s landmarks.


OLYMPIC LEGACY Throughout the construction programme and Games planning, LOCOG has been thinking of tomorrow: with an aim for the Games to leave a lasting legacy and to be remembered not only as a summer of fantastic sport, but as the catalyst for the regeneration of one of the most un- derdeveloped areas of the UK. In building the venues and staging the


Games, LOCOG has raised the bar for both the construction industry and fu- ture large-scale events – developing new standards to which others can aspire.


Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital 33


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