This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EDITOR’S LETTER Inspired by London 2012 W


Seb Coe and his team have delivered world class facilities for London 2012


e-mail: please use contact’s fullname@leisuremedia.com


SUBSCRIPTIONS Denise Gildea +44 (0)1462 471930


EDITOR Liz Terry +44 (0)1462 431385


MANAGING EDITOR Karen Maxwell +44 (0)1462 471920


PUBLISHER David Hunt +44 (0)1462 471902


NEWS EDITOR Tom Walker +44 (0)1462 471934


JOURNALISTS Pete Hayman +44 (0)1462 471938


PRODUCTS EDITOR Martin Nash +44 (0)1462 471933


DISPLAY ADVERTISING John Challinor +44 (0)1202 742968 Jan Williams +44 (0)1462 471909


DESIGN Ed Gallagher +44 (0)1905 20198 Andy Bundy +44 (0)1462 471924


INTERNET Michael Paramore +44 (0)1462 471926 Dean Fox +44 (0)1462 471900 Tim Nash +44 (0)1462 471917


CIRCULATION MANAGER Michael Emmerson +44 (0)1462 471932


FINANCIAL CONTROL Sue Davis +44 (0)1395 519398


FINANCIAL ADMIN Denise Gildea +44 (0)1462 471930


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital 3


elcome to our London 2012 Olympic Souvenir issue. This entire edition of Sports Manage- ment is dedicated to telling the story of how you – our readers, supporters and advertisers – have created this once in a lifetime event, and to celebrating your achievements.


The arrival of London 2012 has unleased an exciting wave of reports and debates on exercise and


wellness, as agencies and research bodies take advantage of the high profile afforded by the Games. The House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology has just entered the fray by


releasing an exciting and thought provoking report, Sport and exercise science and medicine: building on the Olympic legacy to improve the nation’s health. This examines the Olympic legacy and calls on the government to place more emphasis on preventative healthcare through increases in physical activity. It says there’s a “causal link between physical activity and health benefits for a very wide range


of diseases” highlighting that the bill for inactivity in the UK is £5bn a year in direct costs and an additional £8.2bn a year in indirect costs. It calls for further research into this and recommends “the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and other research funders should stimulate research to translate the findings of sport and exercise science and medicine into public health benefits”. The Committee was obviously underwhelmed by Sports Minister Hugh Robertson, saying his interest was in increasing participation in sport rather than improving the nation’s health, “the latter being the


Paying doctors to prescribe exercise effectively through the Quality and Outcomes Framework is the one thing above all other we can do to make the most difference to the health of the nation


responsibility of the Department of Health”, saying “We find it remarkable DCMS is not concerned with the health benefits of sport...we recommend the Government takes a strong, joined-up approach to promoting the health benefits of exercise and physical activity and that DCMS plays an active part in this.” We’ve known for years that nothing will radically change until GPs are trained in sports science and


financially incentivised to prescribe exercise and the Select Committee report hits the nail on the head by recommending that “the National Health Service, medical schools and the General Medical Council... ensure appropriate training is available for health professionals to support the prescription of exercise as a preventative measure and treatment – both at undergraduate level and in CPD opportunities.” Further reinforcing this point, in its representation to the Select Committee, Sport England argued


that exercise prescription should “sit alongside pharmaceutical and surgical interventions,” and made a case for a “cultural change to improve national physical activity levels...led by the NHS”. Most excitingly, the Select Committee “invites the NHS to consider adding physical activity to the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF)” (the system of performance management and payment of GPs). This is great news indeed. I’m sorry to be cynical, but I’ve always believed that as soon as doctors are


paid to prescribe exercise, it will happen super fast – as if by magic. Paying GPs to prescribe exercise effectively is the one thing above all other that we can do to make the most difference to the health of the nation. And just to round out the argument nicely, new research, published in a


most timely fashion in The Lancet the same week as the Select Committee report, found that inactivity kills as many people globally as smoking – 5.3million deaths a year. There really isn’t much more to add.


Liz Terry, editor lizterry@leisuremedia.com twitter: elizterry the leisure media company publishes


PHOTO CREDIT: GETTYIMAGES.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84