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Working on a project with such press, broadcast and political


The Olympic Torch has been carried through 1,000 UK neighbourhoods by more than 7,000 torchbearers to date


scrutiny has been a unique challenge. If anything goes not quite to plan, everyone watches how you recover that situation


Man power Keen to be part of this historic sporting event, a quarter of a million people applied to the Games Maker volunteer programme and this number was whittled down to 70,000 by a team of specially selected interviewers. “Our Games Makers are fantastic,” Deighton says. “They were taken through their orientation training at locations around the country, before embarking on specific venue training. We then sub-set some of them for leadership training.” “We have 6,000 to 7,000 of our own


paid workforce who are also Games Mak- ers and then another 1,000 people who work for our contractors in areas such as catering, cleaning, driving, retailing and security. They’ve gone through the same recruitment, training, uniform accredita- tion and rostering because the success of these Games is all about having everyone highly motivated, trained for the right job in the right place and with schedules that they can actually meet. “The successful deployment of the


workforce is an important logistical exer- cise, of which the volunteers are a critical part, and a really big part of what we


Issue 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


have to get right in the final phase of Games preparation,” he says. More recently, G4S – the private sector


security solutions provider for the Games – has been unable to deliver the required number of properly trained security guards in time for the Games, result- ing in the Home Secretary, Theresa May, confirming that the government would be providing 3,500 military personnel to make up the shortfall. Deighton says: “Security for the Games


is big and complex but we have the best brains in the security business working on this – the Home office, the Metro- politan Police, the Ministry of Defence and the world’s largest security business. Delivering a safe and secure Games is ev- eryone’s number one priority.”


Big challenges So far LOCOG and the Olympic Delivery Authority has earned itself plenty of accolades for setting the stage for the Games in time and within budget. But Deighton says the overall project has certainly had its fair share of challenges. “At one level it’s just the sheer scale and complexity of it. You’ve got 26


different sports at the Olympics, 26 dif- ferent sports at the Paralympics, 35 competition venues, more than 100 other venues to get ready and you’re working with a multitude of different stakehold- ers. You’re working across the private sector, with sponsors and suppliers and working with the public sector – both central government, city government and London boroughs – as well as gov- ernment agencies such as the police and Transport for London. My background is predominantly private sector so learning how to work with different elements of the public sector was new for me. “Similarly working on a project with


such press, broadcast and political scru- tiny has been a unique challenge. If anything goes not quite to plan everyone watches how you recover that situation. There’s no other business role where you get that degree of real-time coverage.”


Young inspiration Throughout the build up to Games-time, there have been many questions asked surrounding tangible post-Games legacy. Inspiring young people into regular sport and physical activity was a key promise


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