This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK 31.


32. 33. 34. 35. 36.


37.


38. 39. 40. 41. -


Offence classifications 56A and 56B were introduced from 1 April 2008 and had previously been recorded as classification 56.


Including offences of 'other criminal damage' of value £20 and under. Excluding offences of 'other criminal damage' of value £20 and under.


Includes offences of burglary, offences against vehicles, other theft offences, fraud and forgery and criminal damage. Possession of controlled drugs offences were split with effect from April 2004 into possession of cannabis and


Offence classification 10B was introduced from 1 April 2008. Possession of firearms offences are those offences where the weapon has not been used during the commission of another offence.


These are offences under the Firearms Act 1968 and other Firearms Acts connected with licensing and certification of firearms. Such offences are not included in the firearms offences statistics which are discussed in Chapter 3 of Crime in England and Wales 2009/10: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs10/hosb1210.pdf.


The large increase in 2006/07 was due to the recording of threats made against shareholders of GlaxoSmithKline by The large increase in this offence is mainly due to the recording of fly-tipping by some forces following advice that this


These offences were added to the series from 1 April 2002. Some forces have revised their data and totals may not therefore agree with those previously published. Indicates that data are not reported because the base number of offences is less than 50.


The notes above and on the preceding pages are those that accompany the Crime in England & Wales series issued by the Home Office. It can be seen that there have been multiple amendments and additions to the series since 1997. Frequent observations from commentators suggest that there was a degree of political influence in these changes, in order to create a blurred picture of crime, so as to project the impression that crime is falling at perhaps a greater rate than is actually experienced. The most significant of these changes were the Home Office Counting Rules introduced in March 1998 and the National Crime Recording Standard introduced in April 2002, both of which had a distorting effect on the statistical value of the process.


The numbered references relate to numerous lines of offences contained within the group headings listed in the reduced version presented here.


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