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Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK 6.THE NUMBERS GAME


The media feeding frenzy for the latest crime statistics emerged again in January 2011, following the release of the latest crime figures for the twelve month period ending September 2010. The predictable 5% drop in recorded crime follows the pattern of previous years resulting in the now expected doubt, mistrust and scepticism about the integrity of the data. From all the evidence we have presented in this report thus far, combined with our analysis of the statistics over the following pages, indicates that there is indeed cause for concern.


http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20110120/tuk-figures-reveal-5-fall-in-crimes-6323e80.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12238962


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/number-of-crimes-fall-by-nine-million- 2189548.html http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/jan/20/crime-statistics-year-zero-labour http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/media-centre/press-releases/crime-stats http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/media-centre/news/crime-statistics


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/8271733/Crime-review-raises- suspicion.html


Frontline police officers have long since tried to raise public awareness about the scurrilous strategies engaged by Chief and Senior Officers in the pursuit of declining crime and increased detection targets.


Home Secretary, Theresa May has clearly recognised the suspicion and doubt that surround crime statistics, by announcing a review led by the national statistician to decide which independent body should have future responsibility for the publication of crime statistics and to oversee the implementation of recommendations last year from the UK Statistics Authority.


To quote her speech in the House of Commons :


"I am concerned that our existing measures of crime are confusing and offer the public only a partial picture of the true level of offending. It is in the public interest that we have measures of crime that are clear, meaningful and in which the public can have confidence. While the UK Statistics Authority saw no evidence of political interference in crime statistics published by the Home Office, I believe bolder action is needed to more clearly demonstrate their political independence. For that reason, I have decided to move future formal responsibility for the publication of crime statistics to an independent body".


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