This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK Further reading on HOCR/NCRS/NSIR:


HOME OFFICE COUNTING RULES - Incorporating the National Incident Category List (NICL) http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs08/countnsir08.pdf


National Crime Recording Standard (NCRS): an analysis of the impact on recorded crime Companion Volume to Crime in England and Wales 2002/2003 Part One: The national picture http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/rdsolr3103.pdf


National Crime Recording Standard (NCRS): an analysis of the impact on recorded crime Companion Volume to Crime in England and Wales 2002/2003 Part Two: Impact on individual police forces


http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/rdsolr3203intro.pdf


Home Office Research Study 204: Review of police forces’ crime recording practices http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs/hors204.pdf


Changes in crime recording practices - Last updated: 31 October 2008 The purpose of this note is to explain the effect on the number of crimes recorded by the police of changes in recording practices – most notably the 1998 change to the counting and coverage rules and the 2002 implementation of the National Crime Recording Standard. http://www.parliament.uk/briefingpapers/commons/lib/research/briefings/snsg-02607.pdf


THE IMPACT OF HOCR, NCRS & NSIR UPON CRIME STATISTICS Source: http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/rdsolr3103.pdf


Many crimes go unreported, and not all those reported to the police are necessarily recorded as crimes, whilst previous research has also suggested significant variation in recording practices. The two models which different police forces used to count crime


• ‘prima facie’, essentially treating all allegations as worthy of recording; • ‘evidential’, requiring a certain degree of evidence to justify recording.


Statistics have become increasingly important to all areas of public policy. They both serve to highlight and describe the nature of social problems and also to monitor and inform the policies and practices designed to remedy them. Yet, in many complex areas of public policy, the practice of recording, collating and producing statistics has evolved over time. The field of crime statistics has been no exception. There has been considerable debate over recent years as to the relative merits and shortcomings of recorded crime statistics in England and Wales, and several attempts have been made to reform the process of collecting and presenting them to provide greater reliability and accuracy.


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