This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK


http://www.audit- commission.gov.uk/SiteCollectionDocuments/AuditCommissionReports/NationalStudies/Cri me%20Data_finalproof_WEB.pdf


The adoption of a National Standard for Incident Recording (NSIR), identified in the National Policing Plan 2004, arose out of widespread recognition of the limited value of non-crime and non-notifiable crime incident recording within the Police Service of England and Wales. The need to be able to measure and compare the effectiveness of operational delivery within this area of policing was the catalyst for creation and implementation of the Standard.


The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), the Association of Police Authorities (APA) the Home Office and the NPIA view NSIR as a significant opportunity to facilitate and support the attainment of improved service delivery.


Background:


The National Standard for Incident Recording (NSIR) was developed by the Home Office following the acknowledgement in 2003 that the crime and incident recording systems in place at the time had limited value. Police Forces used widely varying systems for recording incidents and non-notifiable crimes. These systems allowed huge amounts of valuable information to be lost and were not sufficiently robust to ensure that the data produced was sound. In some forces, up to 50% of demand was classified as ‘miscellaneous’.


The concept of NSIR was outlined in the National Policing Plan 2004 and, with the tripartite support of the Home Office, Association of Police Authorities (APA) and Association of Chief Police Officers, a development phase and a year’s pilot was conducted. Following this, the National Incident Category List (NICL) was published, allowing all policing demand to be classified in a consistent manner. The resulting information is highly valuable to forces both as intelligence; management and performance information, representing 70-80% of total policing demand.


The National Standard (including NICL) is now published once a year, in April and is mandated in all forces through the Home Office Annual Data Requirement 342 (ADR 342). NSIR also includes counting rules and instructions on governance, management and self- audit procedures. The data recorded centrally through ADR 342 gives a unique, national perspective on policing demand for the first time.


As of April 2007, every Home Office force had implemented NSIR (with the exception of the Metropolitan Police Service, and by default the City of London Police, who share the same Command and Control system. The MPS has implemented the ASB categories from NICL, whilst the City of London Police have found a work-around way to provide NICL data without the full set of NICL categories in place).


From late 2006 the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) has managed the governance for NSIR (on behalf of ACPO and other key stakeholders), via the National


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