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Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK


1992. Nobody knows why, and, during that time, crime recording policy has changed direction repeatedly adding layer upon layer of obfuscation to the mess, as if to throw distraction techniques into the pot to disguise the deceitful practices.


If you really want to understand the reality of crime in this country, the figures that matter are the research which show that just 1% of the population suffer 59% of all violent crime; that just 2% of the population suffer 41% of all property crime. And where are these victims?Most criminals commit their offences within 1.8 miles of their own front door. In other words, they rob their neighbours. Overwhelmingly, those offenders live in the shabby tower blocks and rotting council estates which have been consumed by poverty and criminalised by the war against drugs. That is where crime is booming, far, far away from where our Chief Officers deploy their resources toward easier middle class detection pickings in the middle class suburbs. In these inner city areas, as a single example, an 18- year-old lone woman with a child is more than five times more likely than the average to be a crime victim – far away from the statisticians and the politicians and their celebrations of success.


In this analysis we will delve further into the practices that have brought our crime statistics into such disrepute, leaving all but the exceptionally naïve bereft of confidence in a system so corrupt as to undermine the good work being done by our front line officers.


This report will only make brief references to the British Crime Survey (BCS), which is an annual survey conducted among 47,000 members of the public. Whilst seen as a useful barometer of the enormity of crime, it has a number of flaws that preclude it from serious statistical analysis. The survey excludes many relevant areas to any statistical work, failing to cover all notifiable offences and based on estimates drawn from a particular catchment group. We will therefore focus our attention on the area that raises most cause for concern, police recorded crime.


To begin with, it is essential to gain an insight into the background of recorded crime, its antecedent history and the pertinent changes made to the process that have affected its validity, acceptance and overall confidence. We will therefore look briefly at the history of recorded crime, referring to Home Office documents and other sources so heavily relied upon by the media, politicians, academics and statisticians for the official line on the subject.


We will follow this with a closer look at the actual statistics produced in recent years, make some critical observations drawn from real police experiences and produce some startling factual evidence to demonstrate precisely how and why we believe recorded crime has become a pernicious conspiracy of deceit.


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