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Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK What about crimes where the victim is effectively the State?


For State based crimes (eg possession of drugs/weapons) then these should only be recorded where the points to prove to evidence the offence have been made out. This will normally be where a suspect is caught in possession of an unlawful article, but there may be cases where the points to prove have been made out although there is no suspect present (e.g. Production of cannabis offence, where a hydroponics factory is found after a search of an address).


How is the NCRS managed?


There is a Steering Group for NCRS that has ACPO / Superintendents Association / Federation / HMIC / Audit Commission representation along with Force Crime Registrar’s from around the Country that steer the work of crime recording. Sub groups on specific issues containing policing representatives report to the Steering Group. Two seconded police officers at the Home Office also work to liaise with and overcome issues raised by forces to present coherent policy and ensure that concerns raised by forces can be dealt with efficiently and effectively.


Who can I go to for advice about crime recording issues?


Each force has a Force Crime Registrar who acts as final arbiter for crime recording and detection decisions in line with the Home Office Counting Rules for Recording Crime and NCRS. FCR’s have an in-depth level of knowledge about NCRS and also act as the link between the force and Home Office.


Police recorded crime


Police recorded crime statistics provide a good measure of trends in well-reported crimes, are an important indicator of police workload, and can be used for local crime-pattern analysis. They do not, however, include crimes that have not been reported to the police or that the police decide not to record.


So, What is the National Crime Recording Standard?


The NCRS was introduced in all police forces in April 2002 to make crime recording more consistent. In December 2004, the Audit Commission published an assessment of crime recording and concluded that the quality of crime recording by the police had generally improved. Compliance with the NCRS has improved over time, with audits commissioned by the Police Standards Unit showing substantial improvements in compliance between year 1 (2003) and year 2 (2004).


Police recorded crime statistics, like any administrative data, will be affected by the rules governing the recording of data, systems in place and operational decisions on the


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