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Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK


brought someone out [of prison] but he could not identify any premises because he always went in at the back, during the hours of darkness. So we got nothing. We had a detection but it was two days over the time limit and the Crime Registrar would not let us have it.


Comment


The discussions of sanction detection targets provided some of the best and most worrying examples of the negative effects of WFM. In addition to diverting effort and resources from the investigation and detection of more serious crime, the pressure to achieve sanction detections is threatening the integrity of officers. On some BCUs officers are tempted to adopt practices which could have serious consequences for them if they were to come to light.


The senior officers who exert these production pressures were accused of duplicity by turning a blind eye to such infractions whilst making grand statements in public about the importance of police integrity.


In the report on the findings of the 24/7 response policing study (Chatterton and Bingham: 2006 140) it was strongly recommended, contrary to what had been proposed in Building Communities, Beating Crime (CM 6360), that forces (and BCUs) which have achieved an excellent performance grading should be the subject of the most rigorous inspection to establish how this has been achieved. The findings of this study with regard to sanction detections suggest that such rigorous inspection has now become an imperative if police integrity is to be assured and if the lessons of good practice are to be learnt.


Chatterton, M., (2008). Losing the Detectives; Views from the Frontline. Police Federation of England and Wales


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