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Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK


They produce bad jobs just to feed the sanction detection machine. Polish squatters are regularly nicked and arrested for burglary. They call them burglars, but they're not a burglar in any sense that my mum or your wife would recognise as a burglar. They break into empty premises to squat, uniform arrest them to get a tick in the box and the CID end up processing them and cautioning them for burglary.


Invariably when discussing the pressure on 24/7 response officers the groups referred to Penalty Notices for Disorder corroborating what was reported in the earlier study of 24/7 response resilience (Chatterton and Bingham: 2006).


Easy ways of getting sanction detections? Get them to produce penalty notices for disorder. Currently disorderly people are being done for a Section 5 Public Order Act, oh and for harassment.


The use of cautions in cases, where this is not strictly permitted, illustrate how close to the wire some officers are operating:


Take the use of cautions, for instance. If we can’t get a charge we will get a caution for that person so we don’t lose the sanction detection. That applies even if they have already been cautioned and are strictly not eligible for another caution because that gives us the sanction detection. So we’re helping the figures along even though, in my view, it’s morally wrong.


The use of TICs to produce sanction detections proved to be a sensitive area but one which is highly productive if the offender can be contacted quickly prior to being sentenced or if there has been a DNA hit incriminating someone serving a prison sentence. Forty-three per cent of sanction detections for burglary in a dwelling resulted from TICs (Nicholas, op cit).


The range of housekeeping activities in which members of the forces represented in the study were said to engage, tended to vary across the forces. ‘Cold prison’ visits to convicted offenders for prison write-offs are a thing of the past but taking a prisoner out of jail, after a DNA hit, to identify other premises where they have committed burglaries is still practised.


Detectives in some forces appeared to be much more cautious than those in others when engaging in this practice and claimed they would not be able to persuade their Crime Registrar to accept as detections cases which apparently others experienced no problem in getting through.


Our docket squad produce somewhere between 25 and 30% detection rate per burglary. They will respond to fingerprint and DNA hits but also trawl through the force system to look for offenders on bordering BCUs who have admitted offences and cold call them in prison before they are sentenced. [They] bring them out and see if they will admit any on us because they are obviously talking to police about admitting further offences. We


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