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Crime Of The Century - A Chilling Look At Crime Statistics In The UK


GLOSSARY ACPO The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) develops policy on behalf of all police forces. ACPO’s members include chief constables, deputy chief constables, assistant chief constables or their equivalents in the 43 police forces of England, Wales and Northern Ireland, national police agencies and certain other forces in the UK, Isle of Man and Channel Islands plus senior non-police staff. BCU Basic Command Units cover over 300 geographically defined areas in England and Wales, variously named as districts, areas, operational command units and divisions. Varying in size between 100-1,000 officers and covering densely populated, ethnically diverse inner cities or vast tracts of sparsely populated countryside. (HMIC, Going local – the BCU Inspection Handbook, Home Office) BCS The British Crime Survey measures the amount of crime in England and Wales by asking people about crimes they have experienced in the previous year. The BCS includes crimes that are not reported to the police, so it is an important alternative to police records. (Home Office) CDRP The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 created 376 Crime & Disorder Reduction Partnerships to reduce crime and anti-social behaviour in every council area. The Act requires local agencies to work together, and states that councils and the police shoulder the prime responsibility to deliver improvements. The Local Government Act 2000 extended this responsibility by requiring councils to provide for the social, economic and environmental well-being of communities. (Audit Commission, Community Safety Partnerships – learning from audit, inspection and research) HMIC Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary promotes the efficiency and effectiveness of policing in England, Wales and Northern Ireland through inspection of police organisations and functions to ensure that: ● agreed standards are achieved and maintained; ● good pracce is spread; and ● performance is improved. HMIC also provides advice and support to the Home Secretary, police authorities and forces, and plays an important role in the development of future leaders. HOCR The Home Office Counting Rules for the counting and classifying of notifiable offences recorded by the 43 police forces of England and Wales. The rules incorporate the National Crime Recording Standard. (Home Office) ‘No crimes’ A record crime may be classified as a ‘no crime’ if one of the following criteria is satisfied: (a) the crime was committed outside the jurisdiction of the police force in which it was recorded;


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