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CASE STUDY ZIGZAG The programme


Hooking kids in with a celebrity angle, Britain’s Got Talent fi nalists Strike teamed up with ZigZag to launch a kids’ martial arts-based programme last month. How it works


Created by Strike, this fun-based, hour-long class combines martial arts, dance and gymnastics – all choreographed to music – for four- to 16-year-olds. As well as mini grading sessions and the chance to be awarded belts at the end of each term, each class covers life skills with a ‘Strike chat’, discussing everything from confi dence to respect. What’s needed?


Training: Included within the cost of a licence, Strike’s Liam Richards and Danny Ball will train existing instructors to deliver the 12-week programme and offer follow-up training days.


Minimum studio size: 10x10m. Equipment: No specifi c equipment requirement, other than mats. Pulse’s Junior MAX scheme


(see case study, right) offers three sessions: Motivator, Adrenalin and Xtreme


“Of course this is being driven by


government policies [it’s recommended that children between the ages of fi ve and 12 get at least 60 minutes of activity a day], initiatives such as Every Child Matters and Change4Life, plus countless hard-hitting statistics in the press. But, for the fi rst time, parents are pushing for us to provide after-school and weekend activities too.” Parental interest has been further fuelled by the mainstream media, with the likes of Jamie Oliver putting healthy eating and exercise for kids on prime time TV. Parents like play-based programming


because it captures kids’ imaginations and it works. And as any teacher will tell you, parent power is not to be underestimated. There’s never been a better time for clubs to take up the baton. Parents aside, the big driver is


october 2010 © cybertrek 2010


CASE STUDY PULSE The programme Taking exercise into today’s ‘PC world’, Pulse runs interactive children’s programming under a scheme called the Junior MAX programme (standing for Maximum Attitude to Exercise), launched in July 2008. How it works The programme offers three different sessions – from the easiest, Motivator, through Adrenalin for intermediates to the toughest, Xtreme – all aimed at eight- to 14-year-olds, and all using the Pulse Vibe circuit. Classes are designed to improve fi tness, confi dence and self-esteem and engage kids without it feeling like ‘hard work’. What’s needed? Training: Ideally all instructors should be qualifi ed to FOCUS Gym Instructor level and registered with REPs. Minimum studio size: A space the size of a squash court. Equipment: Pulse Vibe kids’ range.


that, unlike traditional PE sports, group programming is all-inclusive. “Group classes engage those


children typically excluded from traditional competitive sports. They ease insecurity by tapping into that ‘pack mentality’,” says Andy Jackson, global commercial director at FitPro. “Just consider the success of our teamjam programme in attracting


teenage girls to dance-based activity. It’s much more fun for teenagers to work out to the latest chart hits, rather than enduring circuit training to the tune of the PE teacher’s whistle.” The stimulus behind the ever-


growing list of new kids’ classes doesn’t stop there. “PCTs have got involved too,” explains Glen Jones, managing director of Cyber Coach. “In recent


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 33


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