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rehab
T
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A
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O
RE
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AB
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AT
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Amanda Baker looks at the
stages of rehabilitation, and
at how fitness equipment
can be used to help deliver
rehab programmes
ighly tailored therapies
“H
are no longer just a
concern for healthcare
service providers
such as physiotherapy practices and
rehabilitation centres,” says Holm
Hofmann, UK business development
manager for milon International.
“Health clubs are increasingly becoming
a port of call for would-be patients with
orthopaedic, neurological or other non-
surgical complaints.
“However, the demands of these
potential new recruits and the pressure to
achieve results are also increased. Here,
results are not simply about pain relief or
treating medical conditions but also about
the speed with which this is achieved.”
So how can manufacturers of fi tness
equipment help health club operators
to effectively rehabilitate their
customers after injury? To answer this
question, it’s vital to understand the
stages of rehabilitation.
STAGE 1 STABILITY Julia Dalgleish, master trainer for
Less is more The ‘Same Side
A classic approach to rehabilitation is to Cybex International UK, says: “When an
Forward’ action of the arms on
stabilise first – ensuring relevant individual sprains an ankle, we know that
Cybex’s Body Arc Trainer mean less
structures and joints remain in a there may be some muscular damage
spinal torsion and quicker recovery
relatively neutral, aligned position – and and probably some tendon and/or
then, after a period of conditioning, ligament damage. Most instructors know
gradually mobilise. that the ligaments and tendons will take machines represent a vital part of the
Stability can be progressively signifi cantly longer to heal than muscular process, as they can stabilise the body
challenged and this typically engages damage. However, few instructors will and joint positions and isolate the
the proprioceptors – sensors in the consider that neural damage will take necessary joint actions to focus the
limbs that provide information about even longer to heal than ligaments/ work where it’s required.
joint angle, muscle length and tension, tendons. Hence, even after muscles, “One often neglected exercise in
which is integrated to give information tendons and ligaments have healed, it’s knee rehabilitation is the use of the leg
about the position of the limb in space. not uncommon for another sprain to extension machine,” says Dalgleish. “On
These proprioceptors can be damaged occur. This is often the result of the our machine, the start and end point
and limit these signals. Joints, muscles poor neural transmission, despite all the of the movement can be adjusted in
and tendons will need rehabilitating, other tissues involved being fully healed.” 10-degree increments. This ensures
but nerves therefore usually require One way to achieve stabilisation is that load is applied to the joint angle in
rehabilitation too. using resistance. Selectorised strength accordance with the training principle
july 2009 © cybertrek 2009 Read Health Club Management online 47
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