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FEATURE


Open-access publishing Unlocking information


With the raft of policies and mandates that impact researchers and their institutions Siân Harris asks a range of publishers and publishing services companies about their approaches to open access


Juliane Ritt, executive vice president for OA/marketing services at Springer O


pen-access publishing has spread globally, but a key challenge remains in educating researchers about it. In some fields, such as biomedicine and life sciences, and in countries like the UK, researchers have become quite familiar with the concept of OA and its requirements. However, in other fields and countries this is not yet the case. We need to educate researchers about the basics of OA, such as the differences between gold and green, existing policies in their countries and that OA journals follow the same high-quality


12 Research Information AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2014


principles as subscription journals. This is especially true in countries where new mandates have just been launched, such as China (see page 6). In countries like Brazil, where researchers are used to publishing OA with no article- processing charges (APCs) via Scielo, we need to explain to researchers and societies who need or want to publish OA why charging APCs is a necessity for our journals. Many researchers also lack knowledge about


the availability of funding. For that reason, we have created an extensive funding database, which provides researchers visiting our website with funding information relevant specifically to them. When it comes to institutions and funders, challenges can vary significantly depending on their specific interest, how established OA is in that area, and if mandates are already in place or not. These challenges range from administration issues, availability of data, and


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