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View from the classroom


steps within it. Each step has a video which introduces the coding activity and shows you what to do. Each Unit has lesson plans which describe the activities, outcomes, vocabulary, objectives and assessment opportunities. There is a step-by-step progression through the topic which is extremely useful to pupils, who guided by video, can work at their own pace and make their way through the resource.


Give us an example of a coding activity you have created?


There is a maze game where you have to navigate a spaceship around a maze using specific keys (U for ‘up’, D for ‘down’ etc.). This was created by one of the Year 5 children.


What additional resources do you use? We use floor robots (e.g. Beebots) in Early Years and KS1 where children can physically control and give instructions to the robot.


Our Year 5s and Year 6s also use ‘Scratch’ to create computer games using more complex procedures and code.


Many of the teachers


were worried about teaching coding because they feel they don’t have the skills or subject knowledge needed to teach it properly.


How have the teachers responded to this? The teachers like Espresso Coding, mainly because the clear structure and video instructions helps them teach coding. There is a step-by-step video at the beginning of each section that takes teachers through the topic and lesson plan which is brilliant to reduce anxiety levels and build confidence.


What have been the benefits to the teachers?


The main benefit is there is a clear structure to the lesson and teachers do not have to hunt around for lesson plans and other supporting material in order to deliver the lesson effectively. Espresso Coding is the ‘full package’ and provides teachers with everything they need to teach coding successfully. The clear progression also helps them build confidence in teaching coding.


How have the pupils responded to coding? The pupils love it! Many choose to use it in school if they have a ‘choosing’ time in the Computer Suite. Many also have been accessing it at home and saving and sharing the apps that they create on the site. We do not set homework for coding at Campsbourne, so it is refreshing to see pupils taking learning outside the classroom.


How do you cater for different learning needs and styles?


Espresso Coding is very visual – with procedures and actions represented by symbols or pictures – and because of this, I have found that children who normally would struggle with more complex tasks do well with this. They have a video that they can refer back to if their code is not working, or can easily change the order of their procedure on screen.


I have found that letting the children work at their own pace through the steps/lessons has been very beneficial to those children who may need some extra time to consolidate their learning, or who need to repeat something in order to ‘get’ it.


Espresso Education launched Espresso


Coding, a brand new service designed to help primary teachers to deliver the coding aspects outlined in the 2014 Computing curriculum. It includes a


comprehensive scheme of work linked to the 2014 curriculum, 78 step-by-step lessons and tablet-friendly activities,


100s of short, helpful video guides and a bespoke website where up to 500 apps per school can be published and shared. Click here for an overview video.


Tell us about some interesting apps or games that have been created using coding? The children particularly enjoy making maze games, or just ones where you can control the characters on screen at the moment.


uespressocoding@espresso.co.uk


May 2014


www.education-today.co.uk


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