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that the risk of cross-contamination is avoided when carrying out any cleaning task. Durable, tightly-sealed Tork Performance dispensers are highly suitable here, since they protect the wipers from contamination before use, but the W4 Tork Performance dispenser can be hosed down without damaging the wipers inside, and it can even be lifted completely off the wall to allow wall-cleaning to take place.


In food environments, colour- coding is a simple yet highly effective method of avoiding cross- contamination; when different coloured buckets and cloths are used for specific tasks, staff training becomes very simple. Employees quickly come to associate the correct colour cloth with the appropriate


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task, and adhering to a strict regime becomes second nature. Tork Coloured Long-Lasting Cleaning Cloths are available in red, blue, green and yellow, and come in compact packs that can be stored or transported on a cleaning trolley. The food contact-approved cloths work well with detergents and can be used repeatedly without tearing.


In a manufacturing environment, certain sensible health and safety precautions should be taken wherever strong chemicals are in use. Lids should be kept tightly sealed on containers of chemicals to avoid any evaporation into the air, and solvent-contaminated waste should be stored in sealed containers. Workers should be provided with protective clothing


where appropriate too, such as gloves, aprons, goggles or respiratory protection, while premises should always be adequately ventilated during cleaning tasks – staff should be encouraged to report any damaged or defective ventilation or safety equipment to their employer.


However, pre-moistened wipers, colour-coded cloths, effective non- wovens and durable dispensers also have a major part to play in the safety of staff – and these will all form part of a highly effective wiping system.


www.tork.co.uk


a brand of WIPES, MOPS & MICROFIBRES | 93


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