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The Perfect Host


As any cleaning or facilities manager will tell you, cleaning and maintaining the appearance of grouted and textured hard flooring can be a real challenge. While more and more people are becoming aware of the effectiveness of Host von Schrader’s Dry Extraction Carpet cleaning system, many don’t realise that the very same system is ideal for cleaning grouted and textured flooring as well.


In entrance halls, kitchens, bath and shower rooms, grout – a highly porous material – absorbs dirt and grease at an alarmingly fast rate, as Michael Egerton, Managing Director of Host von Schrader explained. He said: “Grout maintenance is normally a very labour-intensive task. The very nature of the material is highly absorbent, not only absorbing both dirt and grease from everyday wear and tear, but also the liquids used for cleaning floors makes the removal of any dirt absorbed by the grout very difficult. After cleaning, dissolved dirt will often come back to the surface of the grout making it look dirty again.


“However, working on the same principle and using the same range of machines as used in our Host Dry Extraction Carpet Cleaning System, grouted and textured floors can be quickly and successfully cleaned and, most importantly, for heavy trafficked public access environments such as hotel entrances, toilets and restrooms, they are ready for use again minutes after cleaning.”


The Host Liberator and Freestyle ExtractorVac machines can both be fitted with specially designed Host Red Grout Brushes – be sure to remember though that these brushes are for grout cleaning only and should not be used on carpeted surfaces. Pre-vacuum the surface with either machine


and then apply the Host Dry carpet cleaning sponges to an area of no more than 500ft2


at one time, with


about a handful per square yard. Brush with the host machine of your choice as you would normally on a carpet, moving the machine north to south and then east to west – the more brushing you do, the better the results. Next, simply vacuum up the dirty Host sponges – the grout will be clean and virtually dry, and any residual moisture will quickly have evaporated leaving the grouting dry, clean and ready for use.


Compared to other and more traditional methods of cleaning grouted and textured flooring, the Host System has a number of important advantages, the most important being that efficient dry cleaning of tiled or slippery surfaces is always better than wet cleaning – from a safety point of view as well as an environmental point of view. Dry cleaning, not wet, is now the idea for cleaning in hospitals, schools or in any environment with sensitive or heavy public access – hotels, public toilets, kitchens, schools, offices and retail outlets.


One system and one machine can easily and quickly solve the problems associated with the safe and effective cleaning of all textured flooring, from ceramic tiling, granite and brick flooring through to slate, limestone, vinyl tiling, and of course carpets. Host Dry extraction cleaning provides the perfect solution with no important downtime lost, and no harsh or toxic chemicals needed, leaving floors that are clean, dry and ready for use immediately!


Michael concluded: “Like many other solutions to everyday cleaning problems, it’s simply a matter of using the right product for the right job. Tiles and hard flooring can often


78 | FLOORCARE, CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE


Find out how Host Von Schrader's Dry Extraction Cleaning System can easily take care of your grouted and textured floors, as well as deep cleaning carpets.


become slippery and dangerous when wet, but in environments such as hospitals and schools, the wet floors can also often harbour bacteria. Dry extraction cleaning can help eliminate these problems as well as through the use of our specially designed Host brushes, which help cleaners tackle what has for years been a very labour intensive and often impossible task.”


www.hostvs.co.uk


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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