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First-Rate Floorcare


Darran Yates, Operations Director for the Industrial & Windows division of In Depth Managed Services, outlines the factors to consider when tackling bespoke floorcare.


Providing clean, safe and healthy fl oors throughout your premises, whatever they may be, cannot just be a vague aspiration – it must be a guaranteed deliverable. Keeping fl oor coverings clean and attractive can only be achieved with professional and regular cleaning, which will help to give a positive message about your business, as well as reducing illness and the spread of infections.


Tailored To Fit Every business is different, and with cleaning, one size most defi nitely doesn’t fi t all. There are a lot of factors to consider when determining what is right for your company. Maintaining hygienic standards is crucial in many different settings, but healthcare providers also have infection control to deal with, whilst catering and food production sites have strict food safety regulations to meet.


Different places within a building will have their own specifi c cleaning needs. Kitchens and eating areas often have to deal with the problems of spilled food and drink, while industrial settings may have even tougher things to cope with.


Not Your Type? With so many different fl ooring materials available, it’s important to know how best these can be maintained. The right cleaning methods must be chosen to suit the type of material; for example, some carpets, such as natural sea grass and coir, can shrink, so it is not advisable to use wet cleaning. In contrast, most modern carpets, such as those with synthetic backing, do not shrink and smooth easily so they can be cleaned using a wet treatment.


Very low moisture powder cleaning systems should be used for the most delicate of carpeting. Acid solutions should not be used on stone fl ooring, as this could etch


74 | FLOORCARE, CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE


the surface or discolour some of the stones. It is also important to remember that when treating wood, you must fi rst check whether the fl oor has been newly laid or sanded to a point where it is very smooth.


Environmental


Considerations We’ve gone to great lengths to fi nd the best and most eco-friendly cleaning solutions. We use a technology that works by breaking down the soil at levels of a millionth of a metre, derived from renewable sources and providing great cleaning results. This approach means that


the solution does the hard work and our water consumption is now far less; carpets are much drier once cleaned, and back in service less than an hour later.


Trained To A T The ability to clean fl ooring well depends greatly on the skill of the cleaning technician. Training people to operate cleaning equipment is vital for increased effi ciency, and to ensure that fl ooring retains its appearance, safety and comfort. We provide all our operatives with high levels of training to British Institute of Cleaning Science standards, and use the latest technology to ensure that the best fl oorcare procedures are followed.


At the core of our operation is our centralised communication centre, providing essential support to the internal and external workforce, and co-ordinating the day-to-day scheduling and deployment of resources.


Technological Innovation Another way in which we measure performance across contracts in real time, is via the use of mobile android technology to send and receive data, such as photographic evidence and signatures.


This technology, combined with web based systems, makes it possible to organise workloads, review new applicant recruitment details and ensure that clients’ requests are fulfi lled. They are also used to complete operative training records and carry out onsite quality inspections, before the information is transmitted back to the communications centre via a web link where it can be viewed and evaluated online by clients.


www.indepth-cleaning.co.uk


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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