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clean technology, or perhaps the cleaning regime is decided based on a generic category such as “safety flooring” or “hard floor”. In some cases, there might even be a policy of standardising cleaning equipment, chemicals and regimes across multiple sites for reasons of economy and ease of training.


Some materials are known to cause staining on PVC floors. Typical examples include:


• Asphalt and bitumen materials • Cardboard/hardboard (wet)


• The transfer of some fire treatments and maintenance materials used on carpets


• Dyes from printed literature or packaging


• Rubber-backed carpets and rubber mats


• Rubber furniture rests and trolley wheels


• Shoe soles not made from non-staining materials


• Heat degradation


• Some chemicals used in cleaners such as pine oil


• Poster paints and powder paints.


In the event of the cleaning regime not being appropriate, the upside is that the flooring will still prove easier to clean than a standard product, whether its properties are fully understood or not. A potential downside is that, if the wrong cleaning regime is applied, the performance of the flooring could be reduced. For example, applying a polish or seal to safety flooring will reduce its slip resistance. Or applying an alkaline cleaner to a PUR surface for deep cleaning, without a neutralising step afterwards, could reduce or remove its easy-clean properties.


Best Practice Altro products are designed for ease of cleaning and hygiene, with an impermeable surface and no grouted joints that could trap bacteria. However, as with any surface, regular cleaning is needed to maintain hygiene, and the frequent removal of spills and dirt will help to prevent the build-up of contamination on the surface. Regular cleaning will also remove any substances that could potentially damage flooring, helping it to perform at its best throughout its lifetime.


It is important to develop a regular cleaning programme which suits the


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usage and traffic of the area. Use an appropriate cleaner at the correct dilution and the recommended temperature, allowing sufficient time for the cleaning agent to work after application, using friction to loosen dirt and rinsing as directed. Always double-check the suitability of cleaning agents for use on PVC floors, don’t use a cleaner containing pine oil, and be sure to remove scuff marks regularly (to remove any rubber heel marks by abrasion, use the correct machine pad, or rub by hand using scouring powder).


Maintenance Matters PVC flooring is innately resistant to impact damage and point loading, as well as watertight and resistant to most chemicals, staining and odours. These are key factors in maintaining hygiene, because damage to floors causes dirt and bacteria to become trapped more easily, making cleaning more difficult. If you spot any damage or other maintenance issues, flag them up as soon as you can to ensure that hygiene doesn’t become compromised.


www.altro.co.uk


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