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New Build, Old Problems


With architects repeatedly attempting to out-do one another in their field, creating the next masterpiece in structural design to stun visitors is a top priority. The mundane details like how to go about cleaning such a build, are given little thought, so Kaivac Inc. is here to clear up a few misgivings about building design.


Building owners, architects, designers, and contractors often spend months — or even years — going over every little detail for a new building. Much time is spent on decisions ranging from what light fixtures to install, to what color of floor coverings to choose, and so on. Yet there is one aspect of building planning and construction that is often overlooked, and it relates to an issue that can prove to be as important — if not more important — as any other aspect of building design: how will the building be cleaned?


52 | FEATURE


More precisely, many facilities are simply not constructed with cleaning in mind. Common examples are ceiling lights that are virtually impossible to change without scaffolding, soap dispensers that drip on walls and floors, paper dispensers that are hard to reach or find, and of course the wall or floor coverings which are selected more for their appearance than for how well they will function or resist soiling.


Fortunately, this problem can easily be rectified. Everyone involved in the planning stages for new construction must simply pay more attention to how a building will be cleaned and maintained once it is in use. This will both help maintain the location more effectively and keep operating costs down.


Key Considerations Those involved in the planning stages for building construction and design should be sure to keep these points in mind:


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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